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Health News Results - 231

15 Oct
Heart Defibs in Schools Are Saving Staff Lives: Study

Heart Defibs in Schools Are Saving Staff Lives: Study

Adult staff in schools are more likely than students to suffer sudden cardiac arrest, but automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are often used and improve the chances of survival, a new study finds.

AEDs are portable devices that deliver an electric shock to try and ...

13 Oct
Pandemic Saw Rise in Kids Swallowing Magnets, Tiny Batteries

Pandemic Saw Rise in Kids Swallowing Magnets, Tiny Batteries

More kids swallowed small magnets and batteries in 2020 compared to previous years -- a worrisome surge that dovetailed with pandemic stay-at-home orders.

An analysis of data from more than 100 U.S. hospitals found that the number of kids 17 and younger who were treated ...

08 Oct
For Kids, Accidental Burns Another Scar of the Pandemic

For Kids, Accidental Burns Another Scar of the Pandemic

Accidental burns among U.S. children rose by one-third during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

"COVID-19 and stay-at-home orders inevitably created a new dynamic between children and their social environment. One result was the increas...

05 Oct
Big Rise in Injuries From E-Scooters, Hoverboards

Big Rise in Injuries From E-Scooters, Hoverboards

Hoverboards, electric scooters and electric bikes are the transportation of choice for a growing number of Americans, but they're taking many straight to the emergency room.

Injuries associated with these so-called "micromobility products" skyrocketed 70% between 2017 an...

21 Sep
Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after...

20 Sep
When Cardiac Arrest Strikes, Survival Odds Are Better at Airports

When Cardiac Arrest Strikes, Survival Odds Are Better at Airports

If you have a cardiac arrest, your odds of survival are best in an airport or airplane, a new study finds.

That's because automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are readily available and so are people ready to help, researchers explained.

"Our findings emphasize ...

13 Sep
9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.

Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who to...

09 Sep
Time Is Brain: Mobile Stroke Units Reduce Disability, Study Finds

Time Is Brain: Mobile Stroke Units Reduce Disability, Study Finds

Every second counts after having a stroke, and rapid-response mobile stroke units can start clot-busting drugs quickly, potentially staving off lasting damage, new research finds.

Mobile stroke units are special ambulances equipped with imaging equipment and staffed by e...

09 Sep
Early Responders to 9/11 Now Face Higher Odds for COPD

Early Responders to 9/11 Now Face Higher Odds for COPD

Twenty years after the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, researchers report that early recovery workers and volunteers have a high risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

A study of nearly 18,000 workers and volunteers found that those who arrived s...

31 Aug
Safeguarding Your Heart During, After Hurricane Ida

Safeguarding Your Heart During, After Hurricane Ida

Along with other dangers, the aftermath of Hurricane Ida could pose significant heart health risks.

Stress and trauma from the storm that slammed into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and other states could increase heart risk, and the impact may be more significant for h...

30 Aug
Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Save You

Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Save You

A good Samaritan can save the life of someone in cardiac arrest if a portable defibrillator is nearby. Now, a pilot study suggests a new way to get the devices into bystanders' hands: drones.

The study, done in Sweden, found that drone delivery was a feasible way to get ...

27 Aug
Toppling TVs, Furniture Sending Many Young Children to ERs

Toppling TVs, Furniture Sending Many Young Children to ERs

It can happen in an instant. A young child climbs a heavy piece of furniture, and it topples over on the toddler.

New research suggests that's not as rare as you might think: Hundreds of thousands of children have been treated in U.S. emergency rooms for such injuries in...

11 Aug
Barnacles Inspire a Better Way to Seal Off Wounds

Barnacles Inspire a Better Way to Seal Off Wounds

Barnacles may be the bane of ships, but they could point to new ways to quickly halt severe bleeding, researchers report.

Barnacles are small crustaceans that attach to rocks, ship hulls and even other animals, such as whales. Their ability to cling to surfaces that are ...

06 Aug
When Stroke Team Comes to Patients, Outcomes Improve

When Stroke Team Comes to Patients, Outcomes Improve

Dispatching rapid-response medical teams to perform an emergency procedure on stroke patients significantly improves their chances of survival and a good recovery, according to a new study.

Researchers assessed a pilot program in New York City where a mobile intervention...

06 Aug
Women Less Likely to Get Best Care for Deadly Form of Stroke

Women Less Likely to Get Best Care for Deadly Form of Stroke

Women are less likely than men to get the most effective treatment for a serious type of stroke, new research shows.

Emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) is a type of ischemic stroke caused when blockages in large blood vessels cut off significant blood flow to the bra...

30 Jul
Severe Opioid Overdoses Rose by Nearly a Third During Pandemic

Severe Opioid Overdoses Rose by Nearly a Third During Pandemic

Opioid overdose-related visits to U.S. emergency departments rose by nearly one-third during the COVID-19 pandemic last year.

That's the key finding in a new analysis of data from 25 emergency departments in Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, North Carolina, Massachusetts a...

27 Jul
The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar

The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar

Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

"Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an ...

19 Jul
High-Dose Withdrawal Drug in ER Can Help Battle Opioid Addiction

High-Dose Withdrawal Drug in ER Can Help Battle Opioid Addiction

Giving high doses of buprenorphine in the emergency department is a safe and effective way of treating withdrawal symptoms in patients battling opioid addiction, according to a new study.

"Emergency departments are at the front lines of treating people with opioid use di...

12 Jul
Flu Shot Might Help Ward Off Severe COVID

Flu Shot Might Help Ward Off Severe COVID

A flu shot might offer some protection against severe effects of COVID-19, a new study suggests.

If you are infected with COVID-19, having had a flu shot makes it less likely you will suffer severe body-wide infection, blood clots, have a stroke or be treated in an inten...

04 Jul
Backyard Fireworks on the 4th?  Rethink It to Keep Your Child Safe

Backyard Fireworks on the 4th?  Rethink It to Keep Your Child Safe

If you're planning on shooting off fireworks on the 4th of July, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urges you to find other ways to celebrate the holiday.

"We know that sales of fireworks increased in 2020 as did injuries, so parents and caregivers need to be vigil...

01 Jul
Fireworks Deaths Spiked in Pandemic; Stay Safe This 4th

Fireworks Deaths Spiked in Pandemic; Stay Safe This 4th

The COVID-19 pandemic likely played a role in the 50% increase in deaths from fireworks in the United States last year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

Many public fireworks displays were canceled last summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That le...

30 Jun
COVID Can Be More Deadly for Hospitalized Trauma Patients

COVID Can Be More Deadly for Hospitalized Trauma Patients

Having a case of COVID-19 significantly increases hospitalized trauma patients' risk of complications and death, a new study finds.

"Our findings underscore how important it is for hospitals to consistently test admitted patients, so that providers can be aware of this a...

28 Jun
High Deductibles Keep Folks With Chest Pain From Calling 911

High Deductibles Keep Folks With Chest Pain From Calling 911

The public health message has always been loud and clear: If you are experiencing a medical emergency such as chest pain, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

But a new study shows that a $1,000 or higher deductible on your health insurance plan may serve as a d...

11 Jun
Big Rise in Suicide Attempts by U.S. Teen Girls During Pandemic

Big Rise in Suicide Attempts by U.S. Teen Girls During Pandemic

The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and...

05 Jun
Summer Water Fun Can Bring Drowning Risks: Stay Safe

Summer Water Fun Can Bring Drowning Risks: Stay Safe

As you seek to cool down in a pool or at the beach this summer, always keep water safety for yourself and others in mind, an expert urges.

"With children, I always recommend starting swim lessons at an early age and having parents put on floaties or life vests on their c...

04 Jun
ER Visits for Heart Attacks Rebounded After Pandemic Decline

ER Visits for Heart Attacks Rebounded After Pandemic Decline

Emergency care for heart attacks and strokes rebounded in Northern California after initially plummeting in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

That's good news, suggesting that public health campaigns urging people to seek care if they had signs...

10 May
Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack Strikes

Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack Strikes

When young women land in the emergency room with chest pain, they wait longer and get less treatment than their male counterparts, a preliminary study finds.

Using a federal survey of U.S. hospitals, researchers found that younger women with chest pain were treated less ...

10 May
Asthma Attacks Plummeted During Pandemic

Asthma Attacks Plummeted During Pandemic

Call it a silver lining of the pandemic: Asthma attacks fell sharply among Black and Hispanic Americans in the months after the coronavirus first surfaced.

The study included nearly 1,200 participants who provided information about their asthma through monthly online, ph...

06 May
1 in 4 Heart Attacks Arrive With 'Atypical' Symptoms

1 in 4 Heart Attacks Arrive With 'Atypical' Symptoms

A quarter of heart attack patients have atypical symptoms and are less likely to receive emergency care, Danish research reveals.

These patients are also more likely to die within 30 days than those with chest pain.

Atypical heart attack symptoms include breathing ...

05 May
1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

"One r...

02 May
Urgent Care or the ER? Which Should You Choose?

Urgent Care or the ER? Which Should You Choose?

Say you twist your ankle playing catch with your kids. Or maybe your daughter has a rash that's spreading. Do you visit urgent care or the hospital emergency department?

Many cases of injury or illness can be handled at an urgent care clinic rather than a hospital emerge...

16 Apr
Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

While ER visits have stayed below normal levels as the coronavirus pandemic continues, the number of people showing up in the emergency department with mental woes is increasing, new federal government data shows.

Between March 29 and April 25, 2020, visits to emergency ...

09 Apr
Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers in U.S. emergency departments have struggled with significant mental health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

"As the nation moves into what many believe is a fourth wave of COVID, this study i...

06 Apr
Why Are ER Wait Times Getting Longer for Kids in Mental Health Crisis?

Why Are ER Wait Times Getting Longer for Kids in Mental Health Crisis?

U.S. children commonly wait hours in the emergency room for help with a mental health crisis -- a problem that has worsened over time, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2005 and 2015, prolonged ER stays became ever more common for children and teenagers i...

31 Mar
He Watched His Hospitalized Son Battle COVID-Linked Illness

He Watched His Hospitalized Son Battle COVID-Linked Illness

In January, the coronavirus swept through Brian and Maria Padla's family of seven in Philadelphia, starting with their oldest daughter, 16, and then infecting Brian, Maria, and their four younger children.

The virus seemingly came and went without much fanfare for the fa...

29 Mar
Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Kids to the ER

Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Kids to the ER

Nonsmokers usually try to avoid secondhand smoke, but many kids have no option, and now a new study finds tobacco smoke exposure puts them at higher risk of hospitalization.

Compared to other kids, those exposed to secondhand smoke were more likely to have had an urgent ...

24 Mar
When Coal-Fired Power Plants Close, Kids With Asthma Breathe Easier

When Coal-Fired Power Plants Close, Kids With Asthma Breathe Easier

Fewer children end up in ERs for asthma attacks if nearby coal-fired power plants are shut down, a new study finds.

"When these power plants close, we see a reduction of somewhere between 12% and 18% in emergency department visits for asthma," said senior researcher Emil...

18 Mar
Kids' ER Visits for Swallowed Magnets Soared After U.S. Lifted Sales Ban

Kids' ER Visits for Swallowed Magnets Soared After U.S. Lifted Sales Ban

Calls to U.S. poison centers about incidents involving children and high-powered magnets surged more than 400% after a court overturned a ban on the magnets, a new study finds.

"Regulations on these products were effective, and the dramatic increase in the number of high...

18 Mar
On-the-Road Help: 'Mobile Stroke Units' Are Saving People's Lives

On-the-Road Help: 'Mobile Stroke Units' Are Saving People's Lives

Time is never more precious than in the minutes after a stroke. Now, research is confirming that a "mobile stroke unit" can rush aid to patients quickly, potentially saving lives.

"Patients who are treated early benefit from a complete reversal of stroke symptoms and avo...

16 Mar
Drinking, Drunk, Deadly: Know the Signs of Alcohol Overdose

Drinking, Drunk, Deadly: Know the Signs of Alcohol Overdose

Wednesday is St. Patrick's Day, a holiday often marked by one (or more) too many drinks. But experts warn that simple holiday fun can quickly turn deadly when alcohol is involved.

The U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offered these reminders...

15 Mar
Minutes Mean Months: Getting Stroke Care Fast Is Vital, Study Confirms

Minutes Mean Months: Getting Stroke Care Fast Is Vital, Study Confirms

For someone suffering a severe stroke, every 10 minutes that goes by before treatment starts in the emergency room may cost eight weeks of a healthy life, Canadian researchers report.

In fact, delays in the hospital may have worse consequences for recovery than delays in...

15 Mar
Could Low-Dose Aspirin Help Shield You From COVID-19?

Could Low-Dose Aspirin Help Shield You From COVID-19?

It's already being taken by millions to help ward off heart issues, and now preliminary research hints that daily low-dose aspirin might also cut your odds of contracting COVID-19.

As the Israeli research team noted, aspirin is an anti-inflammatory and previous studies h...

04 Mar
She Barely Survived a Severe Form of COVID-19 Hitting Kids

She Barely Survived a Severe Form of COVID-19 Hitting Kids

Like many people this past year, teenager Tyona Montgomery began experiencing a sore throat and a loss of sense of smell and taste in November that suggested she might have COVID-19.

A positive test confirmed it, but she quickly felt better.

Then, just two weeks la...

19 Feb
Panic Attack or Heart Attack? Here's How to Tell the Difference

Panic Attack or Heart Attack? Here's How to Tell the Difference

A heart attack and a panic attack share many similar symptoms, so it's crucial to determine which one it is, experts say.

Chest pain, racing heart, shortness of breath and sweating can occur with both, but only a heart attack can be fatal, according to a team at Penn Sta...

14 Feb
Silent Killer: Watch Out for Carbon Monoxide Dangers This Winter

Silent Killer: Watch Out for Carbon Monoxide Dangers This Winter

Carbon monoxide poisoning can prove fatal without a warning, because it can't be seen, smelled or heard.

It's important to be aware of it, especially during winter when you're indoors and using heat sources to stay cozy.

The Nebraska Regional Poison Center has some...

13 Feb
Misjudging Thin Ice Can Be Fatal, Check First

Misjudging Thin Ice Can Be Fatal, Check First

Before you venture onto frozen ponds, lakes and rivers, it's critical to make sure they're safe, an expert cautions.

"A minimum of four inches of clear, newly formed ice is needed to support one person on foot," according to Curt Sinclair, a natural resources specialist ...

07 Feb
Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Doctors need to do a better job of discussing low blood sugar with patients who take high-risk diabetes medications such as insulin, researchers say.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common serious side effect of diabetes treatment. Severe cases can lead to fal...

04 Feb
Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Being rushed into hospital care can be an emotional experience. So, what a surgeon says to trauma or emergency surgery patients plays a role in how satisfied they are after their operations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 187,000 patients discha...

03 Feb
Anchor It! Toppling TVs, Furniture Can Injure and Kill Kids

Anchor It! Toppling TVs, Furniture Can Injure and Kill Kids

It only takes a second.

Experts are warning that unsecured televisions, bedroom dressers and other heavy furniture can crush, maim and even kill curious children, and the issue may only worsen during stay-at-home lockdowns.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Sa...

02 Feb
Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Black and Hispanic children who land in the emergency room are less likely than white kids to receive X-rays, CT scans and other imaging tests, a new study finds.

Looking at more than 13 million ER visits to U.S. children's hospitals, researchers found that white childre...