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Health News Results - 336

15 Oct
Lyme Disease Often Spotted at Later Stage in Black Patients

Lyme Disease Often Spotted at Later Stage in Black Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The tell-tale sign of Lyme disease is its bulls-eye rash, but that might be harder to spot in Black people, who are often diagnosed with more advanced disease than white people are, new research suggests.

The f...

12 Oct
Access to Top Drugs Makes the Difference for Black Lung Cancer Patients

Access to Top Drugs Makes the Difference for Black Lung Cancer Patients

Equal access to the most effective drugs helps eliminate the survival disparity between Black and white lung cancer patients in the United States, a new study shows.

In general, Black lung cancer patients are more likely to die than white patients, but these findings sug...

10 Oct
Why Skin Cancer Checks Are Even More Important for Hispanic People

Why Skin Cancer Checks Are Even More Important for Hispanic People

When Hispanic people get a skin cancer diagnosis, their tumors are about 17% larger than those of white people, researchers say.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), skin cancer is often diagnosed at a more advanced stage in people with black and brow...

07 Oct
Over 140,000 U.S. Children Have Lost a Caregiver to COVID-19

Over 140,000 U.S. Children Have Lost a Caregiver to COVID-19

It is an excruciating statistic: One in every four COVID-19 deaths in the United States leaves a child without a parent or other caregiver, researchers report.

The analysis of data shows that from April 2020 to July 2021, more than 120,000 children under the age of 18 lo...

05 Oct
Black Americans Still at Higher Risk for Heart Trouble

Black Americans Still at Higher Risk for Heart Trouble

Black Americans have been persistently hard-hit with heart disease risk factors for the past 20 years — and social issues like unemployment and low income account for a good deal of it, a new study finds.

Cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke,...

05 Oct
Medical Mistrust Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy Among Hispanics

Medical Mistrust Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy Among Hispanics

Misinformation and medical mistrust are major drivers of vaccine hesitancy among U.S. Hispanics, new research shows.

The researchers also found that protecting other family members is an important factor in convincing Hispanics to get vaccinated.

The small study in...

05 Oct
Minorities Bore the Brunt of U.S. COVID Deaths: Study

Minorities Bore the Brunt of U.S. COVID Deaths: Study

The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has hit minority groups in the United States hard, with significantly more deaths among Black and Hispanic Americans compared with white and Asian Americans, a new study finds.

According to the report, these disparities highlight the need...

04 Oct
Racial Disparities Persist With Childhood Cancers

Racial Disparities Persist With Childhood Cancers

Black kids and Hispanic kids with cancer fare worse than their white counterparts, a large, nationwide study finds.

"This study suggests that improving health insurance coverage and access to care for children, especially those with low [socioeconomic status], may reduce...

01 Oct
Over Half of Police Killings Aren't Reported, Blacks Most Likely Victims

Over Half of Police Killings Aren't Reported, Blacks Most Likely Victims

While high-profile cases like the 2020 killing of George Floyd have cast a harsh spotlight on police violence in the United States, researchers say deaths attributable to it have been underreported for at least 40 years.

That's the key finding in a new study published S...

29 Sep
Black Parents Most Hesitant About COVID Vaccines for Kids: Poll

Black Parents Most Hesitant About COVID Vaccines for Kids: Poll

In a survey of parents in metro Chicago, nearly half of Black parents (48%) said they were reluctant to have their kids vaccinated against COVID-19, researchers say.

That's significantly higher than the 33% of Hispanic parents and 26% of white parents who expressed vacci...

28 Sep
AHA News: How Black Women Can Take Control of Their Blood Pressure

AHA News: How Black Women Can Take Control of Their Blood Pressure

Black women with high blood pressure may benefit from classes where they learn and practice skills to manage the condition, a small study finds.

In the United States, nearly 58% of Black women have high blood pressure compared to about 41% of white and Hispanic women, ac...

23 Sep
Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

Hispanic people in the United States have lower cancer rates than white people, but they are much more likely to develop certain preventable cancers.

"The good news is that overall cancer rates are lower in Hispanic people, but we are seeing very high rates of infectious...

21 Sep
Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after...

21 Sep
Common Form of Liver Cancer on the Rise in Rural America

Common Form of Liver Cancer on the Rise in Rural America

Liver cancer is on the rise in rural America, but on a downswing in cities, new research shows.

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer and the fastest-growing cause of cancer deaths in the United States. It's rising at an annual rate of ne...

17 Sep
Drug Might Stop Heart Trouble Linked to Sickle Cell Anemia

Drug Might Stop Heart Trouble Linked to Sickle Cell Anemia

Treating sickle cell anemia with the drug hydroxyurea may also reverse related heart abnormalities, a new study suggests.

Heart issues are common among people with sickle cell disease. Among them are enlargement of the heart and an impaired ability to relax heart muscles...

16 Sep
In 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDC

In 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDC

America's waistline keeps widening.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 16 states now have at least 35% of their residents who are obese, a number that's nearly doubled since 2018.

The CDC's 2020 Adult Obesity Prevalenc...

13 Sep
Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Helped Americans' Blood Pressure

Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Helped Americans' Blood Pressure

With the expansion of Medicaid under Obamacare, fewer Americans are uninsured and more are getting their blood pressure and blood sugar under control, a new study finds.

The gains are especially strong among Black and Hispanic patients, according to Boston University res...

13 Sep
Fatal Opioid ODs Keep Rising in Black Americans

Fatal Opioid ODs Keep Rising in Black Americans

The decades-long U.S. opioid epidemic could be hitting Black people harder than white folks as the crisis enters a new phase.

Opioid overdose death rates among Black Americans jumped nearly 40% from 2018 to 2019 in four states hammered by the epidemic, researchers found....

10 Sep
Black Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in Life

Black Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in Life

Black Americans and Mexican Americans typically develop type 2 diabetes up to seven years earlier than their white counterparts, a new study finds.

In all, more than 25% of adults in the two groups reported being diagnosed with diabetes before age 40, and 20% didn't know...

30 Aug
Fewer American Adults Are Getting Malignant Brain Tumors

Fewer American Adults Are Getting Malignant Brain Tumors

Malignant brain tumor rates are declining among U.S. adults, but patients still have a low chance of survival, a new study finds.

The researchers also found that rates of noncancerous tumors are on the rise, likely due to increased awareness and improvements in diagnosis...

25 Aug
Why Do Black, Hispanic Newborns Face Higher Health Risks?

Why Do Black, Hispanic Newborns Face Higher Health Risks?

All births are not created equal, new U.S. research reveals: Differences in the quality of hospital care contribute to a higher chance of complications among Black and Hispanic newborns compared to white and Asian infants.

The analysis of more than 480,000 live births a...

18 Aug
Far Too Few People of Color in U.S. Pancreatic Cancer Trials

Far Too Few People of Color in U.S. Pancreatic Cancer Trials

Racial and ethnic minorities in the United States are severely underrepresented in clinical trials testing cutting-edge treatments for pancreatic cancer, researchers say.

"There are a ton of obstacles to get these patients into clinical trials," said senior author Dr. Jo...

17 Aug
Race-Based Disparities in Americans' Health Haven't Improved: Study

Race-Based Disparities in Americans' Health Haven't Improved: Study

In a paradoxical finding, new research reveals that more Americans of color have access to health insurance now than they did 20 years ago, but their perceptions of their health status have not improved at all.

The study, published Aug. 17 in the Journal of the Amer...

13 Aug
Need a New Liver? Your Survival Odds May Depend on Race

Need a New Liver? Your Survival Odds May Depend on Race

Black American liver transplant recipients have a lower survival rate than Hispanic or white patients, and a new study suggests that alcohol-related liver disease and insurance coverage are key reasons.

"Our findings are a huge wake-up call that physicians and other heal...

11 Aug
Did Obamacare Expand Access to Insurance for Minorities? In Some U.S. States, Hardly at All

Did Obamacare Expand Access to Insurance for Minorities? In Some U.S. States, Hardly at All

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) reduced the ranks of uninsured Americans, but a recent study shows that many U.S. states did little to close racial gaps in health coverage.

Researchers found that in the two years after the ACA came into force, some U.S. states showed large...

06 Aug
Where You Live Could Predict Your Survival After Heart Attack

Where You Live Could Predict Your Survival After Heart Attack

There are many factors that affect your longevity after experiencing a heart attack. And now, new research finds that your neighborhood could play a key role in your long-term survival.

The researchers found that patients in poorer neighborhoods had a lower chance of sur...

29 Jul
Lowering Medicare Age Could Help Close Racial Gaps in Health Care: Study

Lowering Medicare Age Could Help Close Racial Gaps in Health Care: Study

Could reducing racial disparities in health care be as simple as lowering the age at which Americans qualify for Medicare?

Yes, claims a new study that suggests lowering eligibility from age 65 to age 60 could go a long way toward addressing inequities in health insuranc...

28 Jul
Primary Care Doctors Often Miss Heart Failure in Women, Black Patients

Primary Care Doctors Often Miss Heart Failure in Women, Black Patients

White men are more likely to a receive correct and timely diagnosis of heart failure in their primary care doctor's office compared to other types of patients, new research shows.

The serious and common heart ailment is too often missed in women, Blacks and poorer people...

28 Jul
Vitamin D May Lower Black Women's Odds for COVID-19

Vitamin D May Lower Black Women's Odds for COVID-19

Unlocking a clue to why Black women might be more susceptible to COVID-19, a new study shows that low levels of vitamin D may increase their risk of infection.

That doesn't mean that people should rely on vitamin D supplements to protect themselves against COVID-19, howe...

28 Jul
Many Black Men Missed Out on Prostate Cancer Care During Pandemic

Many Black Men Missed Out on Prostate Cancer Care During Pandemic

Black men in the United States have higher rates of prostate cancer than white men, yet they were far less likely to have surgery for their cancer during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from a Pennsylvania urologic da...

27 Jul
Severe COVID for People Under 45: Who's Most at Risk?

Severe COVID for People Under 45: Who's Most at Risk?

Young people aren't immune from severe COVID-19, and a new study warns that some are more at risk than others.

Folks under 45 have more than triple the risk for severe COVID-19 if they have cancer or heart disease, or blood, neurologic or endocrine disorders, according t...

27 Jul
Who's Most Likely to Get Bullied at School?

Who's Most Likely to Get Bullied at School?

Bullying remains a threat to American teens, and a new study reveals which kids may be at highest risk.

Race-based bullying takes a heavy toll on teens, the research found, but minority kids who are picked on for other reasons -- whether gender, sexual orientation, relig...

26 Jul
Patients of Color Less Likely to Get Specialist Care Than White Patients

Patients of Color Less Likely to Get Specialist Care Than White Patients

People of color are consistently less likely to see medical specialists than white patients are, a new U.S. study finds, highlighting yet another disparity in the nation's health care system.

Researchers found that compared with their white counterparts, Black Americans,...

23 Jul
Lockdowns Cut Air Pollution, But Poorer Neighborhoods Benefited Less

Lockdowns Cut Air Pollution, But Poorer Neighborhoods Benefited Less

If you thought the air was cleaner at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, you weren't imagining it. But clean skies were less evident in poorer areas of the United States, a new study finds.

COVID-19 pandemic-related lockdowns reduced overall levels of nitrogen dioxide ...

22 Jul
Even at Same Hospital, Black Patients Face More Complications Than Whites

Even at Same Hospital, Black Patients Face More Complications Than Whites

Black Americans admitted for inpatient hospital care are far more likely than white patients to experience safety-related health complications -- even when both are treated in the same facility, a new report warns.

And having good insurance didn't appear to bridge racial...

21 Jul
COVID Drove Biggest Drop in U.S. Life Expectancy Since World War II

COVID Drove Biggest Drop in U.S. Life Expectancy Since World War II

Exactly how deadly has the coronavirus pandemic been in the United States? New research confirms it has had a big hand in slashing life expectancy by a year and a half.

That's the lowest level of life expectancy since 2003 and the largest one-year decline since World War...

20 Jul
White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

The U.S. medical field is less dominated by white men than it used to be, but there are still few Black and Hispanic doctors, dentists and pharmacists, a new study finds.

The study, which looked at trends over the past 20 years, found that white men no longer make up the...

20 Jul
Screening Often Misses Endometrial Cancer in Black Women

Screening Often Misses Endometrial Cancer in Black Women

A noninvasive method of screening for endometrial cancer often fails to detect signs of it in Black women, a new study says.

The findings raise questions about the use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) to determine the need for a biopsy in these patients, according to th...

19 Jul
Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical Debt

Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical Debt

The coronavirus pandemic has left plenty of Americans saddled with medical bills they can't pay, a new survey reveals.

More than 50% of those who were infected with COVID-19 or who lost income due to the pandemic are now struggling with medical debt, according to resear...

16 Jul
Why Many Black & Hispanic Americans Distrust COVID Vaccines

Why Many Black & Hispanic Americans Distrust COVID Vaccines

Language barriers and distrust of the health care system are among the reasons why many Black and Hispanic Americans are reluctant to get COVID-19 vaccines, a new study finds.

The two groups -- which have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic -- have followed ...

15 Jul
Extreme Heat Hits Poorer Neighborhoods Harder

Extreme Heat Hits Poorer Neighborhoods Harder

Extreme heat strikes poor and minority neighborhoods in U.S. cities harder than those that are wealthier and mainly white, a new study finds.

"The distribution of excess urban heat varies within cities, and as a result, communities do not share a city's extreme heat burd...

15 Jul
More Americans Gaining Access to Opioid Addiction Treatment, But Race Matters

More Americans Gaining Access to Opioid Addiction Treatment, But Race Matters

Opioid addiction treatment has become more widely available to Medicaid recipients under the Affordable Care Act, but Black patients are much less likely than white patients to get that treatment, a new study finds.

"Opioid use disorder can be treated, just like any othe...

12 Jul
Black Churches Could Be Key to Boosting Vaccination Rates

Black Churches Could Be Key to Boosting Vaccination Rates

Black churches could prove crucial in improving COVID-19 vaccination rates among Black Americans, a new study suggests.

The COVID-19 death rate among Black Americans is three times higher than among white Americans, and health officials had hoped that vaccines would narr...

12 Jul
Most Cancer Screenings Make Big Rebound After Pandemic Decline

Most Cancer Screenings Make Big Rebound After Pandemic Decline

A major U.S. hospital system had a strong rebound in most cancer screening tests after a steep drop-off in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study shows.

The findings are based on an analysis of data from the Boston-based Mass General Brigham system. ...

09 Jul
Even Before Pandemic, One-Third of U.S. Adults Went Without Dental Care

Even Before Pandemic, One-Third of U.S. Adults Went Without Dental Care

Millions of American adults haven't seen a dentist in at least a year, a new U.S. government health survey reveals.

In 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic made dental visits difficult, a third of adults under 65 hadn't had a dental exam or cleaning in the past 12 month...

08 Jul
California to Pay Reparations to Victims of Forced Sterilization

California to Pay Reparations to Victims of Forced Sterilization

California plans to approve reparations of up to $25,000 to some of the thousands of people who were sterilized decades ago by the state's government.

California will be the third state -- after Virginia and North Carolina -- to compensate victims of the so-called eugeni...

07 Jul
Language Barriers Keep 25 million in U.S. From Good Health Care

Language Barriers Keep 25 million in U.S. From Good Health Care

Due to language barriers, 25 million Spanish speakers receive about a third less health care than other Americans, a large study of U.S. adults shows.

The analysis of federal survey data from more than 120,000 adults revealed that total use of health care (as measured by...

06 Jul
Why Do Black Patients Fare Worse When MS Strikes?

Why Do Black Patients Fare Worse When MS Strikes?

While multiple sclerosis can cause a wide swath of symptoms and challenges for anyone diagnosed with the autoimmune disease, a new study finds that race may play a role in disease severity.

Researchers discovered that Black individuals with MS may be more severely affect...

06 Jul
Almost All Cancer Patients Respond Well to COVID-19 Vaccines

Almost All Cancer Patients Respond Well to COVID-19 Vaccines

Most cancer patients have a good immune response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccines, new research shows.

Two of the three approved vaccines in the United States -- Pfizer and Moderna -- are mRNA vaccines.

Researchers assessed 131 cancer patients and found that 94% developed...

02 Jul
Gap in Breast Cancer Survival for Black, White Patients Shrinks, But Not by Enough

Gap in Breast Cancer Survival for Black, White Patients Shrinks, But Not by Enough

Racial disparities in breast cancer survival have narrowed in recent years, but Black women with the disease still have double the death rate of white women.

That's according to a study that tracked breast cancer trends in Florida between 1990 and 2015. Overall, deaths f...