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Health News Results - 196

30 Jul
Seniors Rarely Discuss Their Drinking With Their Doctors

Seniors Rarely Discuss Their Drinking With Their Doctors

Plenty of seniors may struggle with problem drinking, but a new study shows that less than half of them discuss their alcohol use with their health care providers.

"Older adults are at high risk for the harms of alcohol use, especially for those with existing chronic dis...

26 Jul
Major Medical Groups Call for Mandatory COVID Vaccination for Health Workers

Major Medical Groups Call for Mandatory COVID Vaccination for Health Workers

All health care workers should be required to be vaccinated against COVID-19, dozens of major U.S. medical groups said in a joint statement released Monday.

"Due to the recent COVID-19 surge and the availability of safe and effective vaccines, our health care organizatio...

26 Jul
Survey Finds U.S. Parents Split on COVID Vaccination for Kids Under 12

Survey Finds U.S. Parents Split on COVID Vaccination for Kids Under 12

As a new school year approaches, U.S. parents are nearly evenly split on whether they'll vaccinate their young kids when a COVID-19 vaccine is approved for their age group, a new survey finds.

"It's important that parents and providers don't wait for full COVID vaccine a...

23 Jul
Doctors Divided Over Use of Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

Doctors Divided Over Use of Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

The controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm is creating something of a civil war in medicine, as health networks, hospitals, insurers and individual doctors weigh impending discussions with patients about whether they should take the medication.

Many doctors believe t...

20 Jul
White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

TUESDAY, July 20, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. medical field is less dominated by white men than it used to be, but there are still few Black and Hispanic doctors, dentists and pharmacists, a new study finds.

The study, which looked at trends over...

19 Jul
Do Women or Men Make the Best Doctors?

Do Women or Men Make the Best Doctors?

MONDAY, July 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When you're hospitalized, you'll want qualified medical professionals treating you, but does it matter if your doctor is a man or a woman?

It might.

A new study in Canada found that patients cared for by...

16 Jul
Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination — advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant p...

11 Jul
Why Even the Healthy Need a Primary Care Doctor

Why Even the Healthy Need a Primary Care Doctor

A primary care doctor isn't only for when you're sick. Even folks who are generally healthy need a doctor who can help them stay that way.

"Everybody should have one," said Dr. Vera Guertler of Penn State Health Medical Group-Eastbrook in Ronks, Pa.

"Just like eve...

05 Jul
Telehealth: Tips for Helping Kids With Autism Take Part

Telehealth: Tips for Helping Kids With Autism Take Part

Telehealth is increasing in popularity in the United States, partly due to the pandemic. But some children with autism have difficulty sitting through these virtual appointments.

Yet those visits can be a helpful part of a child's ongoing medical care, and their convenie...

22 Jun
Too Many Older Americans Are Taking Daily Aspirin

Too Many Older Americans Are Taking Daily Aspirin

Many older adults are still taking a daily baby aspirin to ward off first-time heart problems -- despite guidelines that now discourage it, a new study finds.

Researchers found that one-half to 62% of U.S. adults aged 70 and up were using low-dose aspirin to cut their ri...

22 Jun
More Than Half of People With Asthma Aren't Seeing a Specialist

More Than Half of People With Asthma Aren't Seeing a Specialist

Among Americans with severe asthma, less than half see a specialist to manage their condition, new research shows.

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommends patients with severe asthma be referred to a specialist for evaluation and care.

To find...

15 Jun
Almost All U.S. Physicians Have Gotten a COVID Vaccine

Almost All U.S. Physicians Have Gotten a COVID Vaccine

While COVID-19 vaccination rates may lag among some groups, that's not the case for practicing physicians in the United States.

More than 96% are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, with no significant difference in vaccination rates across regions, according to a new su...

14 Jun
Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the...

08 Jun
Think You Can Skip That Annual Physical?  Think Again

Think You Can Skip That Annual Physical?  Think Again

Despite calls from some leading health experts to scrap annual physicals because they are a waste of time and money, a new study finds advantages to routine screenings.

"While it is disappointing that I can't tell my patients a visit with me or my colleagues will help th...

06 Jun
Your Doctor Appointments Might Look Different Post-Pandemic

Your Doctor Appointments Might Look Different Post-Pandemic

If it's been a while since you've seen your doctor, it may be time to schedule a visit to catch up on preventive health screenings or discuss any health concerns and chronic medical conditions.

During the 15 months since people began quarantining, many have avoide...

03 Jun
After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the medical society and its network of 12 influential journals.

Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor-in-chie...

01 Jun
JAMA Journals' Editor-in-Chief Steps Down After Deputy's Racism Comments

JAMA Journals' Editor-in-Chief Steps Down After Deputy's Racism Comments

Because of controversial statements about racism made by a staff member, the editor-in-chief of JAMA and JAMA Network will step down on June 30, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Tuesday.

Dr. Howard Bauchner, JAMA's chief since 2...

24 May
Just 1 in 10 People With Alcohol Problems Get Treatment

Just 1 in 10 People With Alcohol Problems Get Treatment

Americans with drinking problems are rarely referred for treatment, even though most say a doctor has asked about their alcohol use, a new study finds.

The study is not the first to uncover low rates of treatment for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) -- the medical term ...

17 May
Pandemic Caused Rise in Telemedicine Visits for Kids, But Will the Trend Continue?

Pandemic Caused Rise in Telemedicine Visits for Kids, But Will the Trend Continue?

Virtual doctor visits for children grew this past year during the pandemic, but a new poll shows U.S. parents are divided on whether they will continue using this option in the future.

The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the Universit...

17 May
Parents' Input Key When Screening Toddlers for Autism

Parents' Input Key When Screening Toddlers for Autism

Early screening for autism can speed up diagnosis and treatment, and now new research shows that pediatricians are more likely to act when parents express concerns.

According to pediatricians surveyed in the study, only 39% of toddlers who had failed a screening looking ...

05 May
Most Top U.S. Surgeons Are White and That's Not Changing

Most Top U.S. Surgeons Are White and That's Not Changing

White people continue to dominate top surgery positions at U.S. universities, while the number of Black and Hispanic surgeons remains flat, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of talented surgeons of different races, ethnicities and genders who do wonderful work and are ...

03 May
Many Older Americans Aren't Telling Their Doctors They Use Pot

Many Older Americans Aren't Telling Their Doctors They Use Pot

Aging potheads are now past 50 and still puffing away, but new research shows that many don't disclose this to their doctors.

Folks who use marijuana for medical reasons are more likely to tell their doctors about it than recreational users. Still, just a fraction of med...

03 May
Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Health care in rural America has become ever more scarce during the coronavirus pandemic, with folks finding it increasingly difficult to find a doctor or get to a hospital.

For a decade, rural areas have been losing hospitals to financial problems, forcing residents to ...

21 Apr
Little Progress in Boosting Numbers of Black American Doctors

Little Progress in Boosting Numbers of Black American Doctors

The percentage of U.S. doctors who are Black has barely risen in the past 120 years, and there's still a wide pay gap between white and Black physicians, a new study finds.

The analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from 1900 to 2018 included about 150,000 physicians, with ...

16 Apr
Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

While ER visits have stayed below normal levels as the coronavirus pandemic continues, the number of people showing up in the emergency department with mental woes is increasing, new federal government data shows.

Between March 29 and April 25, 2020, visits to emergency ...

14 Apr
4 in 10 Adults Over 50 Consult Online Reviews When Picking a Doctor

4 in 10 Adults Over 50 Consult Online Reviews When Picking a Doctor

Finding a new doctor can be a daunting task. For help, many older adults turn to online reviews, a new study finds.

In fact, many people rate online reviews as highly as they would a recommendation from friends and family when picking a doctor, the new research found.

09 Apr
Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers in U.S. emergency departments have struggled with significant mental health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

"As the nation moves into what many believe is a fourth wave of COVID, this study i...

06 Apr
Strain of COVID Care Has Many Health Professionals Looking for an Exit

Strain of COVID Care Has Many Health Professionals Looking for an Exit

After the pandemic, the next great health care challenge in the United States could be retaining highly trained doctors, nurses and scientists, a new study warns.

Up to one in five employees at an academic medical institution are considering leaving their professions ...

01 Apr
COVID Fears Mean More Cancers Are Being Diagnosed at Later Stages

COVID Fears Mean More Cancers Are Being Diagnosed at Later Stages

Cancer screening rates are beginning to rebound after plummeting during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey finds.

And patients are being diagnosed with more advanced cancers than before the pandemic, according to the American Society for Radiation O...

31 Mar
Too Few Minorities in U.S. Health Care Workforce: Report

Too Few Minorities in U.S. Health Care Workforce: Report

Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans are significantly underrepresented in U.S. health professions, with little indication that diversity will improve, a new study says.

In 2019, Black people made up about 12.1% of the U.S. workforce, but their representation in 10 hea...

26 Mar
Most Post-Surgical Opioids Go Unused: Study

Most Post-Surgical Opioids Go Unused: Study

Using cellphones to track patients' painkiller use, a new study found more than 60% of opioid painkillers prescribed to surgical patients after their procedures went unused.

That has implications for the ongoing epidemic of opioid misuse in the United States, where unuse...

25 Mar
In Rare Cases, People Can Get COVID After Vaccination

In Rare Cases, People Can Get COVID After Vaccination

It's very rare, but it is possible to catch COVID-19 even if you've been vaccinated, a new study finds.

Looking at vaccinated health care workers at two University of California campuses, researchers found a tiny number tested positive for the virus. This finding highli...

23 Mar
Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

Health care workers were just as uneasy as everyone else when COVID-19 vaccines were about to be approved in the United States, with large numbers hesitant to take the shot in early December, a new study reveals.

But that hesitancy dwindled over the next few weeks, as he...

23 Mar
Shortage of Primary Care Doctors Is Costing American Lives

Shortage of Primary Care Doctors Is Costing American Lives

The United States could save thousands of lives each year by addressing its lack of enough primary care doctors, a new study projects.

There has been a shortfall of U.S. primary care doctors for a long time, with much of the problem concentrated in rural areas and povert...

19 Mar
Surgical Patients Allergic to Penicillin Have Another Safe Alternative

Surgical Patients Allergic to Penicillin Have Another Safe Alternative

The antibiotic cefazolin is a safe alternative to prevent infection in most surgical patients who are allergic to penicillin, according to a new study.

Cefazolin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin. It's the recommended antibiotic for most surgical procedure...

17 Mar
Talks With Doctors May Be Key to Vaccine Acceptance: Study

Talks With Doctors May Be Key to Vaccine Acceptance: Study

Talking with their doctors may help convince reluctant Americans to get COVID-19 vaccines, evidence from a previous pandemic suggests.

Researchers analyzed responses from more than 19,000 people in the United States who were surveyed during the H1N1 swine flu pandemic in...

16 Mar
Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

Health care workers are more likely to catch COVID-19 at home or in their community than on the job, a new study finds.

"The news is reassuring in that it shows the measures taken are working to prevent infections from spreading in health care facilities," said study co-...

03 Mar
Choice of Brand-Name Drug Over Generics Costs Medicare Nearly $2 Billion Annually

Choice of Brand-Name Drug Over Generics Costs Medicare Nearly $2 Billion Annually

Wider use of prescription generic drugs could save Medicare nearly $2 billion a year, researchers say.

The new analysis of Medicare Part D prescription drug claims for 2017 used a random 20% of beneficiaries, 224 drugs with one or more generic substitutes and at least 1,...

02 Mar
Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Black and Hispanic Americans already face higher risks for dementia than the general population. Many also believe they'd get worse dementia care compared to white patients, according to a new Alzheimer's Association special report.

Older Black Americans are about twice ...

01 Mar
Many Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: Study

Many Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: Study

If you've gone to the doctor for a urinary tract infection (UTI), chances are that you've been given the wrong antibiotic or a longer-than-necessary treatment plan.

That's even more likely if you live in a rural area, researchers say.

A new study of private insuran...

23 Feb
Many Older Adults Confused About Proper Use of Antibiotics: Poll

Many Older Adults Confused About Proper Use of Antibiotics: Poll

Many older Americans lack knowledge about antibiotics, with some admitting to using leftover medication, a new survey reveals.

More than 2,200 adults, aged 50 to 80, were questioned. Nine out of 10 said they're cautious about using antibiotics, and nearly that number kne...

09 Feb
Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Although Alzheimer's disease is a devastating diagnosis that is better delivered earlier rather than later, new research suggests poor patients living in rural areas may not have access to the specialists who could spot the first signs of memory declines.

The team from V...

07 Feb
Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Doctors need to do a better job of discussing low blood sugar with patients who take high-risk diabetes medications such as insulin, researchers say.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common serious side effect of diabetes treatment. Severe cases can lead to fal...

04 Feb
Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Being rushed into hospital care can be an emotional experience. So, what a surgeon says to trauma or emergency surgery patients plays a role in how satisfied they are after their operations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 187,000 patients discha...

03 Feb
Most Dermatology Patients Like 'Telehealth' Visits: Survey

Most Dermatology Patients Like 'Telehealth' Visits: Survey

A majority of dermatology patients are happy with telehealth appointments in place of in-person office visits, a new study finds.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many medical specialties to move from in-person to online appointments, but dermatology had already seen inc...

02 Feb
Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Black and Hispanic children who land in the emergency room are less likely than white kids to receive X-rays, CT scans and other imaging tests, a new study finds.

Looking at more than 13 million ER visits to U.S. children's hospitals, researchers found that white childre...

02 Feb
Too Many U.S. Doctors Biased Against Patients With Disabilities: Study

Too Many U.S. Doctors Biased Against Patients With Disabilities: Study

Dr. Lisa Iezzoni is all too familiar with the discrimination that patients who have a disability can face: Having lived with multiple sclerosis for more than four decades and now in a wheelchair, she has also studied health care experiences and outcomes for people with disabil...

28 Jan
Too Many Kids With Special Needs Are Going Without Adequate Support

Too Many Kids With Special Needs Are Going Without Adequate Support

As many as one in five U.S. children has special health care needs, and some of their caregivers are struggling to get them the support, care and services they need, new research shows.

Kids with special health care needs may have physical conditions (such as asthma or d...

17 Jan
Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You

Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You

If you're having eye problems, you may not know which type of specialist to consult.

Here's some help from experts who explain the roles of an optometrist, ophthalmologist, pediatric ophthalmologist, orthoptist and optician.

Optometrists provide comprehensive eye c...

07 Jan
1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

One in four doctors has been personally attacked or sexually harassed on social media, a new study finds.

Women are more likely to be sexually harassed, while both men and women are attacked based on religion, race or medical recommendations, researchers say.

Docto...

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