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Results for search "Environment".

24 Mar

Listening To The Sounds of Nature Has Major Health Benefits, Study Finds.

The sound of birds singing and rain falling can boost your health and lower stress, researchers say.

29 Dec

Is Your Favorite Seafood Contaminated With Microplastics?

These 3 seafood species have the highest levels of plastic particles, researchers say.

Health News Results - 296

16 Jun
Mold a Big Threat to People With COPD

Mold a Big Threat to People With COPD

Exposure to mold both in and out of the home may worsen breathlessness and other symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), new research suggests.

More than 16 million Americans have COPD, according to the American Lung Association. COPD is an umbrella ter...

16 Jun
Even Good Weather Didn't Lift Lockdown Blues: Study

Even Good Weather Didn't Lift Lockdown Blues: Study

In normal times, a sunny day can lift your mood while a stormy one can darken it, but new British research shows that weather had little effect on people's spirits during the pandemic.

"We know that lockdown restrictions, and the resulting impact on social life and the e...

15 Jun
Dirty Air in Pregnancy Might Raise Baby's Obesity Risk

Dirty Air in Pregnancy Might Raise Baby's Obesity Risk

Children may have an increased risk of obesity if their mothers were exposed to high levels of air pollution during pregnancy, researchers say.

In a new study, 123 Hispanic mother-infant pairs were enrolled in an ongoing trial in the Los Angeles region. Before pregnancy,...

02 Jun
Global Warming to Blame for 1 in 3 Heat-Related Deaths Worldwide

Global Warming to Blame for 1 in 3 Heat-Related Deaths Worldwide

Human-caused global warming is responsible for more than one-third of heat-related deaths worldwide, but the proportion is much higher in certain countries, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data gathered between 1991 and 2018 from 732 locations in 43 countries. Th...

01 Jun
Smog Might Damage Your Sense of Smell

Smog Might Damage Your Sense of Smell

Breathing in tiny particles of air pollution over a long period of time may put your sense of smell at risk, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the risk for loss of smell - a condition called anosmia - was nearly doubled among people with lengthy exposu...

28 May
Amazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging Brains

Amazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging Brains

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian ...

27 May
Global Warming Could Bring More Stillbirths, Study Warns

Global Warming Could Bring More Stillbirths, Study Warns

Rising temperatures caused by climate change could trigger a worldwide increase in stillbirths, researchers warn.

The team at the University of Queensland in Australia analyzed 12 studies on the subject. They found that exposure to extremely high temperatures throughout ...

18 May
City Parks: Safe Havens That Don't Raise COVID Infection Risks

City Parks: Safe Havens That Don't Raise COVID Infection Risks

Sitting or strolling in a park offered precious respite for many Americans during the pandemic, and new research shows city parks don't fuel the spread of COVID-19.

Researchers looked at how people used parks in Philadelphia and New York City during the pandemic and fou...

15 May
Is Your Family 'CO Safe' When Big Storms Hit?

Is Your Family 'CO Safe' When Big Storms Hit?

If you live in the path of hurricanes , the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging you to be prepared.

Deaths from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, fires and electric shock are common during severe weather events, according to the CPSC.

Hurricane s...

14 May
Two Out of Three California Prison Inmates Said Yes to COVID Vaccine

Two Out of Three California Prison Inmates Said Yes to COVID Vaccine

Sixty-seven percent of inmates in California prisons who were offered a COVID-19 vaccine have accepted at least one dose, a Stanford University study found.

"This is one of the largest state prison systems in the country, and if it can achieve high vaccination coverage a...

11 May
Meat Production Is Dirtying the Air You Breathe

Meat Production Is Dirtying the Air You Breathe

Steaks and burgers could be killing thousands of Americans each year, but in a way most people wouldn't expect -- via air pollution.

That's the conclusion of a new study estimating that airborne particles generated by food production kill nearly 16,000 Americans each yea...

10 May
Asthma Attacks Plummeted During Pandemic

Asthma Attacks Plummeted During Pandemic

Call it a silver lining of the pandemic: Asthma attacks fell sharply among Black and Hispanic Americans in the months after the coronavirus first surfaced.

The study included nearly 1,200 participants who provided information about their asthma through monthly online, ph...

07 May
Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air pollution isn't hard on the hearts of adults only, suggests a new analysis that found it can raise blood pressure in kids as young as 5.

Children experienced increases in blood pressure if they had short-term exposure to air polluted with coarser particles or long-te...

06 May
Race, Neighborhood Affects How Long You'll Live After Heart Attack

Race, Neighborhood Affects How Long You'll Live After Heart Attack

The risk of dying within five years of a heart attack is notably higher among poor Americans than their wealthier peers, but race also plays a role, a new study reveals.

While Black residents of poor neighborhoods appear to face a higher risk of death than their counterp...

04 May
Wildfires Are Changing the Seasonal Air Quality of the U.S. West

Wildfires Are Changing the Seasonal Air Quality of the U.S. West

Increasing numbers of wildfires are making poor air quality more common throughout the Western United States, according to a new study.

The findings suggest that many cities may soon have trouble meeting air quality standards, said lead author Kai Wilmot, a doctoral stud...

30 Apr
Heat Waves Topping 132 Degrees F Likely in Middle East Without Action on Climate Change

Heat Waves Topping 132 Degrees F Likely in Middle East Without Action on Climate Change

The Middle East and North Africa are already among the hottest spots on the planet, but new research warns that if nothing is done to slow climate change there will be life-threatening heat waves with temperatures of 132 Fahrenheit or higher in those regions.

"Our resul...

29 Apr
Breathing Dirty Air Could Raise a Child's Risk for Adult Mental Illness

Breathing Dirty Air Could Raise a Child's Risk for Adult Mental Illness

Kids exposed to air pollution may be at risk for mental illness in early adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that young adults in Britain who were exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollutants during their childhood and teen years were prone t...

29 Apr
One Reason It's Hotter in Poorer Neighborhoods: Fewer Trees

One Reason It's Hotter in Poorer Neighborhoods: Fewer Trees

Poor neighborhoods in the United States have fewer trees and are hotter than richer neighborhoods, new research shows.

In the study, the researchers assessed tree cover in the 100 largest urban areas of the country.

In nine out of 10 communities, there was less tre...

23 Apr
No Genetic Damage to Kids of Those Exposed to Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: Study

No Genetic Damage to Kids of Those Exposed to Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: Study

There's no evidence of genetic damage in the children of parents who were exposed to radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, researchers say.

Several previous studies have examined the risks across generations of radiation exposure from...

22 Apr
Don't Linger: 'Aerosolized Droplets' Hang in the Air After Toilet Flush

Don't Linger: 'Aerosolized Droplets' Hang in the Air After Toilet Flush

If you're in a public restroom, you may not want to hang around too long, because lots of airborne pathogens are hanging around, too.

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science conducted flush tests in a public restroom wit...

22 Apr
Wildfire Smoke Can Trigger Eczema, Study Finds

Wildfire Smoke Can Trigger Eczema, Study Finds

When wildfires choked the air and turned the skies orange throughout the American West in recent years, they caused a variety of health problems from coughs and runny noses to life-threatening heart attacks and strokes.

But eczema and other skin issues were a result of t...

21 Apr
Eviction Bans Helped Stop COVID's Spread in Cities: Study

Eviction Bans Helped Stop COVID's Spread in Cities: Study

Eviction bans during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced infection rates not only in people who avoided displacement but also in their communities, according to a new study.

"When it comes to a transmissible disease like COVID-19, no neighborhood is entirely isolated," said st...

20 Apr
Dirty Air Could Raise COVID Risks for People With Asthma, COPD

Dirty Air Could Raise COVID Risks for People With Asthma, COPD

Long-term exposure to polluted air could increase the risk of severe COVID-19 in people with respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), new research shows.

For the study, researchers at the University of Cincinnati examined the ...

19 Apr
Is It Allergies or COVID? Expert Shows How to Tell the Difference

Is It Allergies or COVID? Expert Shows How to Tell the Difference

Seasonal allergies are striking this year at the worst possible time, with the United States in the midst of a fourth wave of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

You've got an itchy nose and watery eyes. Or maybe you've got a fever and a sore throat. Or you've developed a coug...

19 Apr
Live Near a 'Superfund' Site? Your Life Span Might Be Shorter

Live Near a 'Superfund' Site? Your Life Span Might Be Shorter

Living near a Superfund hazardous waste site may shorten your life, new research suggests.

There are thousands of Superfund sites across the United States and they include manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mines where hazardous waste was dumped, ...

15 Apr
Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress does not trigger binge eating in people with eating disorders, new research suggests.

The findings challenge a common theory that's never been directly tested in patients, according to the study authors.

Their research included 85 women (22 with anorexia, 33...

14 Apr
A Woman's Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her Granddaughter's Health Today

A Woman's Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her Granddaughter's Health Today

A long-banned pesticide may be having health effects that ripple across generations, a new study suggests.

At issue is DDT, a once widely used pesticide that was banned in the United States in 1972. That ban, however, was not the end of the story.

DDT is a per...

09 Apr
Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

COVID-19 might have a tough new foe: The sun.

New research shows that sunnier regions of the United States have lower COVID-19 death rates than cloudier areas, suggesting that the sun's UV rays might somehow provide some protection against the disease.

The effect i...

07 Apr
More Biodiversity, Better Mental Health?

More Biodiversity, Better Mental Health?

It probably won't show up on any real estate listing, but making your home in a place with many different kinds of birds and plants may be good for you.

That's the upshot of a German study that showed people who live in areas with greater biodiversity have better mental ...

06 Apr
Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists thought twice about studying North American bats in their winter habitats. But they've now determined that the risk of humans passing the coronavirus to bats under these conditions was low.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

29 Mar
Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Kids to the ER

Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Kids to the ER

Nonsmokers usually try to avoid secondhand smoke, but many kids have no option, and now a new study finds tobacco smoke exposure puts them at higher risk of hospitalization.

Compared to other kids, those exposed to secondhand smoke were more likely to have had an urgent ...

24 Mar
When Coal-Fired Power Plants Close, Kids With Asthma Breathe Easier

When Coal-Fired Power Plants Close, Kids With Asthma Breathe Easier

Fewer children end up in ERs for asthma attacks if nearby coal-fired power plants are shut down, a new study finds.

"When these power plants close, we see a reduction of somewhere between 12% and 18% in emergency department visits for asthma," said senior researcher Emil...

24 Mar
Waves Lapping, Birds Singing: Nature's Sounds Bring Healing, Study Finds

Waves Lapping, Birds Singing: Nature's Sounds Bring Healing, Study Finds

If you feel recharged after a day spent in the great outdoors, there's a physiological reason for that.

Bird song and lapping waves combat negative feelings such as annoyance and stress, while boosting positive emotions and health, according to new research using the sou...

21 Mar
Spring Cleaning Can Sweep Away Allergens From Your Home

Spring Cleaning Can Sweep Away Allergens From Your Home

If seasonal allergies get you down, try tackling them with a good spring cleaning.

This can not only ease some of those spring symptoms, but also get rid of allergens you've been living with for a while, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology...

17 Mar
AHA News: Study Links Green Communities to Lower Stroke Risk

AHA News: Study Links Green Communities to Lower Stroke Risk

The greener the neighborhood, the lower the stroke risk, a new study suggests.

Researchers matched images gathered from space to health data from residents to come up with their findings. The work adds to evidence that shows where someone lives affects their health, said...

17 Mar
Storm Alert: How to Keep Your Home Safe

Storm Alert: How to Keep Your Home Safe

Winter weather can bring hidden dangers, the most deadly of which can include carbon monoxide poisoning and fires.

As blizzards, tornadoes and severe storms batter the nation and many lose power and heat, the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires from portable ge...

15 Mar
Racist 'Redlining' Policies Leave Legacy of Stroke for Black Americans

Racist 'Redlining' Policies Leave Legacy of Stroke for Black Americans

Discriminatory housing practices from nearly a century ago continue to influence a person's risk of suffering a stroke, claims a new study that reveals the legacy of structural racism in the United States.

Researchers found a 1.5% higher rate of stroke within census trac...

15 Mar
Common Household Chemicals Tied to Preemie Births

Common Household Chemicals Tied to Preemie Births

Even when women do their best to have a safe pregnancy, chemicals commonly found in the home could still raise their risk for premature delivery, a new study shows.

The chemicals -- called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) -- are used as flame retardants in items li...

12 Mar
Backyard Chicken Coops Pose Threat of 'Viral Spillover' to People

Backyard Chicken Coops Pose Threat of 'Viral Spillover' to People

Raising chickens in your backyard -- a popular trend during the COVID-19 pandemic -- holds risks that can come home to roost in an unwelcome way.

It's already well known that poultry can spread the salmonella bacteria to human handlers. But chickens cooped up in backyard...

09 Mar
Pollen Peril: Sneezin' Season May Up COVID Risk

Pollen Peril: Sneezin' Season May Up COVID Risk

It's that time of year when flowers and trees bloom freely and pollen makes the lives of many miserable. But new research reveals a hidden risk: It could also make you more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection.

COVID-19 infection rates waxed and waned with pollen counts in 2...

08 Mar
Global Warming Could Make Survival in Tropics Impossible: Study

Global Warming Could Make Survival in Tropics Impossible: Study

Limiting global warming to targets proposed in the Paris Agreement could keep tropical regions from reaching temperatures that are beyond human tolerability, a new study projects.

Researchers estimate that if countries are able to cap warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius above...

05 Mar
How Moving the Homeless to Hotels During the Pandemic Helps Everyone

How Moving the Homeless to Hotels During the Pandemic Helps Everyone

Giving homeless COVID-19 patients a free hotel room for their quarantine and recovery pays huge health dividends for the entire community, according to a new study out of San Francisco.

Only 4% of homeless folks transferred from Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital ...

04 Mar
American Indians Face the Highest Odds for Stroke

American Indians Face the Highest Odds for Stroke

While strokes strike many Americans, a new study shows the risk is particularly high among American Indians.

Researchers already knew that American Indians had the highest risk of atrial fibrillation, which is an irregular heartbeat ("arrhythmia") that can increase the r...

02 Mar
How Climate Change Could Put More MS Patients in Danger

How Climate Change Could Put More MS Patients in Danger

When temperatures rise, people with multiple sclerosis need to keep cool. Heat sensitivity is a hallmark of the central nervous system disorder.

So, what happens when warm weather spikes become more frequent because of climate change?

More MS patients end up in the...

01 Mar
Want Less Violent Prisons? Plant More Trees

Want Less Violent Prisons? Plant More Trees

It's already known that green space offers significant benefits in institutional settings, such as hospitals and schools, but new research suggests it may also reduce violence in prisons.

In the new study, researchers compared the amount of trees, lawns and shrubs at pri...

25 Feb
As Climate Change Lengthens Allergy Season, Pollen Travels Farther

As Climate Change Lengthens Allergy Season, Pollen Travels Farther

If you suffer the itchy, sneezy, wheezy consequences of seasonal allergies, you're probably painfully aware that pollen season is starting earlier and lasting longer than ever.

It's an upshot of climate change, and new research from Germany offers an explanation for this...

25 Feb
Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

If you think you can safely exercise without your mask in a gym during the pandemic, two new government reports show you are mistaken.

Coronavirus outbreaks at fitness centers in Chicago and Honolulu last summer were likely the result of exercisers and instructors not we...

24 Feb
Could Americans Get to COVID Herd Immunity by Late Spring?

Could Americans Get to COVID Herd Immunity by Late Spring?

Hungry for good news on the pandemic? One epidemiologist believes Americans might reach herd immunity to the new coronavirus as soon as late spring.

That's the view held by Suzanne Judd, a professor with the school of public health at the University of Alabama (UA) at Bi...

18 Feb
Tougher State Gun Laws, Less Gun Violence Among Teens: Study

Tougher State Gun Laws, Less Gun Violence Among Teens: Study

States with more gun laws have less youth gun violence, new research reveals.

For the study, the researchers examined data from several states from 2005 to 2017, and found that kids were less likely to be armed in states with more gun laws, and more likely to carry a wea...

17 Feb
COVID & Elevators: A Dangerous Mix, But Here's How to Make It Safer

COVID & Elevators: A Dangerous Mix, But Here's How to Make It Safer

As the new coronavirus vaccine rollout gathers speed, elevators will likely become a flash point for businesses hoping to reopen offices while sticking to social distancing.

And a new computer simulation suggests that the usual "first-come, first-served" elevator routine...

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