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Health News Results - 316

24 Sep
Saline Spray Could Slow COVID's Spread in the Lungs: Study

Saline Spray Could Slow COVID's Spread in the Lungs: Study

A saltwater solution may help stop the SARS-CoV-2 virus in its tracks, Brazilian researchers report.

However, although saline may keep the virus from replicating, it does not offer full protection against infection or a cure for COVID-19.

"It's not a single soluti...

24 Sep
Could a Japanese Plant Turn Cold Cuts Into Healthy Fare?

Could a Japanese Plant Turn Cold Cuts Into Healthy Fare?

There's good news for health-conscious sausage and bacon lovers.

A new study suggests the Japanese knotweed plant could be used to make healthier cured meats.

According to researchers, this fast-growing plant that invades gardens and buildings contains a chemical t...

24 Sep
DNA Sensor Can Spot When COVID Is Contagious

DNA Sensor Can Spot When COVID Is Contagious

A new DNA sensor can detect viruses and tell if they are infectious or not in minutes, a new study finds.

The sensor was developed by using DNA technology, and does not require the need to pretreat test samples. Researchers demonstrated this technique with the human ade...

23 Sep
Can Llama Antibodies Fight COVID in Humans? New Research Says They Might

Can Llama Antibodies Fight COVID in Humans? New Research Says They Might

The future of COVID-19 treatments might include a tiny antibody made by llamas.

British researchers credit a llama named Fifi with their finding.

The investigators said these llama nanobodies, which are also produced by camels, could eventually be produced in a lab...

16 Sep
Special 'Strategies' Can Help People With Parkinson's Walk, But Many Patients Unaware

Special 'Strategies' Can Help People With Parkinson's Walk, But Many Patients Unaware

Movement can be very difficult for people with Parkinson's disease, as shaking and stiffness play havoc with balance, coordination and gait.

There are many different tricks Parkinson's patients can use to improve their walking and avoid injury from a bad tumble -- but a ...

16 Sep
Robotics Bring the White Cane Into the 21st Century

Robotics Bring the White Cane Into the 21st Century

The "white cane" that many blind people rely on for navigating the world hasn't been upgraded in a century, but researchers are reporting progress on a "robo-cane" they hope will modernize the assistive device.

The prototype cane is equipped with a color 3D camera, senso...

15 Sep
Stories Get Listeners' Hearts in Sync

Stories Get Listeners' Hearts in Sync

The heart rates of people sync up when listening to a story, a new study finds.

"There's a lot of literature demonstrating that people synchronize their physiology with each other. But the premise is that somehow you're interacting and physically present [in] the same pl...

14 Sep
Israeli Data on COVID Boosters to Be Published This Week in Major Journal

Israeli Data on COVID Boosters to Be Published This Week in Major Journal

TUESDAY, Sept. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) – New data out of Israel, to be published this week, could bolster the notion that a third booster shot of the COVID-19 vaccine significantly lowers a recipient's odds for severe illness.

The data is scheduled to be published in...

08 Sep
New Insights Into Why Asthma Worsens at Night

New Insights Into Why Asthma Worsens at Night

Many people with asthma know their illness can flare up at night, and new research suggests the body's internal clock could be to blame.

The findings could prove important for treating and studying asthma, the researchers said.

"This is one of the first studies to ...

27 Aug
FDA Approves First Nerve-Stimulation Device to Aid Stroke Recovery

FDA Approves First Nerve-Stimulation Device to Aid Stroke Recovery

A first-of-a-kind nerve stimulation treatment for people who have problems moving their arms after a stroke has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

"People who have lost mobility in their hands and arms due to ischemic stroke are often limited in thei...

20 Aug
Survivors' Plasma Won't Help Fight COVID in Patients With Early Symptoms

Survivors' Plasma Won't Help Fight COVID in Patients With Early Symptoms

Early treatment with COVID-19 survivors' blood plasma doesn't prevent disease progression in people who have mild COVID-19 symptoms but are at risk for more severe illness, a new clinical trial finds.

"As physicians, we wanted this to make a big difference in reducing se...

19 Aug
Even Delta Variant Can't Evade Vaccine-Linked Antibodies: Study

Even Delta Variant Can't Evade Vaccine-Linked Antibodies: Study

Antibodies generated by COVID-19 vaccines are effective against the Delta variant and other coronavirus variants of concern, new research shows.

The findings may help explain why m...

19 Aug
Experimental Drug Could Cut Migraine Frequency

Experimental Drug Could Cut Migraine Frequency

A new pill specifically designed to prevent migraines appears to do the job, a new clinical trial finds.

Atogepant cut patients' migraine days in half over 12 weeks of treatment, without causing serious side effects, the researchers said.

Experts said the drug, if ...

17 Aug
Dexamethasone Can Help the Sickest COVID Patients Survive. So Why Are Too Few Getting It?

Dexamethasone Can Help the Sickest COVID Patients Survive. So Why Are Too Few Getting It?

There's strong evidence that the steroid drug dexamethasone can significantly lower hospitalized patients' risk of dying from COVID-19, but many who might benefit from it the most aren't getting it.

"Dexamethasone is a steroid that is used for the treatment of arthritis,...

17 Aug
Physics Shows Why 20 Seconds Is Right for Hand-Washing

Physics Shows Why 20 Seconds Is Right for Hand-Washing

Twenty seconds.

That's how long you need to wash your hands to remove germs, a new physics study confirms.

Typical hand-washing guidelines -- including those from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- advise scrubbing your hands for a minimum of 2...

12 Aug
Bimonthly, Injected PrEP Beats Daily Pill in Warding Off HIV: Study

Bimonthly, Injected PrEP Beats Daily Pill in Warding Off HIV: Study

When the antiretroviral regimen known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, was launched nearly a decade ago, patients were suddenly able to achieve near-complete protection against contracting HIV by taking just one pill a day.

But there's a big hitch: Not everyone is e...

12 Aug
Blood Test Spots Biological Markers for Schizophrenia

Blood Test Spots Biological Markers for Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a debilitating disease that can make navigating daily life a massive challenge, but a new blood test could flag it in its early stages, researchers say.

Their analysis of blood samples identified epigenetic markers -- part of your DNA -- that differ betw...

11 Aug
Barnacles Inspire a Better Way to Seal Off Wounds

Barnacles Inspire a Better Way to Seal Off Wounds

Barnacles may be the bane of ships, but they could point to new ways to quickly halt severe bleeding, researchers report.

Barnacles are small crustaceans that attach to rocks, ship hulls and even other animals, such as whales. Their ability to cling to surfaces that are ...

09 Aug
New Drug Might Be Non-Surgical Option for Common Skin Cancers

New Drug Might Be Non-Surgical Option for Common Skin Cancers

An experimental gel has shown early promise in treating the most common form of skin cancer -- hinting at a potential alternative to surgery in the future.

Researchers tested the gel in 30 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a skin cancer diagnosed in more than 3 m...

05 Aug
CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy Rids Woman of Tough-to-Treat Lupus

CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy Rids Woman of Tough-to-Treat Lupus

In a first, researchers have used genetically tweaked immune system cells to send a woman's severe lupus into remission.

The treatment -- called CAR T-cell therapy -- is already approved in the United States for fighting certain cases of blood cancer. It involves removin...

02 Aug
An ALS Drug Shows Early Promise Against Alzheimer's

An ALS Drug Shows Early Promise Against Alzheimer's

Could a drug used to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) help people with mild Alzheimer's disease?

The results of a small new study suggest the strategy could work.

Riluzole has been used for more than 20 years to slow the progression of ALS, commonly called...

29 Jul
Cats Might Be Purrfect Model for Human Genetics Research

Cats Might Be Purrfect Model for Human Genetics Research

Dogs may be man's best friend, but cats may hold critical keys to humans' health.

Our feline friends have the potential to become a valuable model for genetic research, because their genome is similar to that of people, according to Leslie Lyons of the Feline Genetics La...

28 Jul
How Trust in Science Can Make You Vulnerable to 'Pseudoscience'

How Trust in Science Can Make You Vulnerable to 'Pseudoscience'

Trusting science is good, but it could put you at risk for being duped by false science, or "pseudoscience," if you let your guard down, researchers warn.

Investigators found that people who trust science are more likely to believe and share false claims that contain sci...

27 Jul
'Light Flash' Treatment Might Help Slow Alzheimer's

'Light Flash' Treatment Might Help Slow Alzheimer's

While efforts to develop Alzheimer's medications have so far borne little fruit, new research highlights the therapeutic promise of two non-drug tools: light and sound.

According to a pair of small new studies, exposing Alzheimer's patients to an hour a day of carefully ...

27 Jul
Kids With Autism Have Unique Gut 'Microbiomes'

Kids With Autism Have Unique Gut 'Microbiomes'

Children with autism differ socially and developmentally from their typically developing peers. Now, researchers say there are also differences in their array of healthy gut bacteria or "microbiome."

The findings may lead to earlier treatment for kids with an autism spec...

23 Jul
Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and de...

19 Jul
Chinese Man Dies of Rare Virus From Monkeys

Chinese Man Dies of Rare Virus From Monkeys

A Chinese researcher has died after catching a rare infectious disease called the Monkey B virus, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention officials say.

In March, the 53-year-old veterinarian dissected two dead monkeys as part of his work in a Beijing research ...

19 Jul
Geneticists Probe Origins of Painful Cluster Headaches

Geneticists Probe Origins of Painful Cluster Headaches

The causes of a type of excruciating headache known as cluster headaches aren't clear, but heredity is known to play a role. Now, genetic factors associated with cluster headaches are under investigation as scientists search for more effective treatments.

16 Jul
A Better Test to Help Spot Glaucoma?

A Better Test to Help Spot Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss in older people, and early detection can bring better treatment. Now, researchers in Australia say their experimental genetic test for glaucoma can identify 15 times more people at high risk for the disease compared to a current gene...

15 Jul
Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) research.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology...

13 Jul
Inhaled COVID Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials

Inhaled COVID Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials

Breathing in protection: Scientists say an experimental inhaled COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in animal tests.

"The currently available vaccines against COVID-19 are very successful, but the majority of the world's population is still unvaccinated and there is a critica...

09 Jul
Global Consortium Finds Genes That Drive Severe COVID-19

Global Consortium Finds Genes That Drive Severe COVID-19

Why do some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 have either no or negligible symptoms, while others sicken and die?

Scientists who've pinpointed several genetic markers associated with severe COVID-19 say their findings could provide answers to that important question -- and...

08 Jul
Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality -- and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological bas...

01 Jul
New Drug Shows Real Promise Against Celiac Disease

New Drug Shows Real Promise Against Celiac Disease

An experimental drug can prevent intestinal damage caused by celiac disease, an early trial has found -- raising hopes that it could become the first medication for the serious digestive disorder.

With celiac disease, the immune system attacks the lining of the small int...

29 Jun
Which Blood Sugar Meds Work Best Against Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Blood Sugar Meds Work Best Against Type 2 Diabetes?

You have type 2 diabetes, and you are already taking an old standby drug, metformin. But you still need help controlling your blood sugar levels. Which medication would be the best?

New research pitted several diabetes drugs against each other and came up with an answer:...

29 Jun
CRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs Organs

CRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs Organs

Early research suggests that CRISPR gene-editing technology may some day lead to dramatic relief for patients struggling with amyloidosis, a rare but serious disease that can trigger organ failure.

"There are many different types of amyloidosis," explained study author D...

28 Jun
Coming Soon: An Implanted Pacemaker That Dissolves Away After Use

Coming Soon: An Implanted Pacemaker That Dissolves Away After Use

Researchers are reporting early success with a temporary heart pacemaker that simply dissolves when it's no longer needed.

So far the work has been limited to animals and human heart tissue studied in the lab. But experts said the early findings are "exciting" and could ...

28 Jun
How Much Do Trees Lower Urban Temperatures?

How Much Do Trees Lower Urban Temperatures?

Could trees be the key to a cool summer in the city?

Yes, claims new research that calculated just how much greenery can bring temperatures down.

"We've long known that the shade of trees and buildings can provide cooling," said study co-author Jean-Michel Guldmann...

25 Jun
Lilly to Seek FDA Approval for New Alzheimer's Drug

Lilly to Seek FDA Approval for New Alzheimer's Drug

FRIDAY, June 25, 2021 (Healthday News) -- Fresh on the heels of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of the controversial Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm, the maker of a second medicine that works in similar fashion said Thursday it hopes to apply for approval of its medi...

25 Jun
When, Where Was the First Case of COVID-19?

When, Where Was the First Case of COVID-19?

The first case of COVID-19 may have occurred in China weeks earlier than previously thought, a new study claims.

The first officially identified case occurred in early December 2019, but increasing evidence suggests the original case may have emerged earlier.

In th...

23 Jun
Another Pollen Misery: It Might Help Transmit COVID-19

Another Pollen Misery: It Might Help Transmit COVID-19

Pollen is tough enough for allergy sufferers, but a new study suggests it also helps spread the new coronavirus and other airborne germs.

Researchers had noticed a connection between COVID-19 infection rates and pollen concentrations on the National Allergy Map of the Un...

18 Jun
Sickle Cell Plagues Many Black Americans, But There's Hope for Better Treatments

Sickle Cell Plagues Many Black Americans, But There's Hope for Better Treatments

It's been more than six months since Brandy Compton last landed in a hospital emergency room.

That's an amazing medical achievement, brought about by scientific breakthroughs that have been unfortunately overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic, experts say.

Compt...

17 Jun
Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Aiming to deliver a one-two punch to the herpes virus, animal research on an experimental drug found it tackled active infections and reduced or eliminated the risk of future outbreaks.

Existing treatments, such as Zovirax, Valtrex or Famvir, are only effec...

14 Jun
Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the...

10 Jun
Gene Editing Technique Corrects Sickle Cell Disease in Mice

Gene Editing Technique Corrects Sickle Cell Disease in Mice

Researchers are using mice to study a potential new treatment that could help patients who have sickle cell disease, without some of the risks and side effects of existing therapies.

The investigators reported using genetic-based editing on mice to convert a disease-cau...

07 Jun
'Historic' Decision Expected on U.S. Approval of Alzheimer's Drug

'Historic' Decision Expected on U.S. Approval of Alzheimer's Drug

The first drug ever shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease could be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday, but experts say that approval will be surrounded by controversy.

In clinical trials, aducanumab showed a 22% reduction in the de...

03 Jun
After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the medical society and its network of 12 influential journals.

Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor-in-chie...

27 May
There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

The U.S. government and nonprofits are replacing drug companies as the main drivers of Alzheimer's disease research, two new studies show.

The findings are from an analysis of national data by Jeffrey Cummings, a research professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas ...

26 May
Shoulder Pain Can Plague Wheelchair Users, But Their Own Fat Cells Could Be Cure

Shoulder Pain Can Plague Wheelchair Users, But Their Own Fat Cells Could Be Cure

People with spinal cord injuries can overwork their shoulders as they move about in a wheelchair, and that often leads to chronic shoulder pain.

However, a small study suggests that an injection of the patient's own fat cells can help ease the pain.

The injected ce...

25 May
Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Highly Effective in Kids 12 and Older

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Highly Effective in Kids 12 and Older

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine fully protects children aged 12 to 17, the company announced Tuesday.

In a clinical trial that included more than 3,700 young volunteers, there were no cases of symptomatic COVID-19 infection in the two-thirds of participants who received bo...

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