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Health News Results - 250

15 Oct
Lyme Disease Often Spotted at Later Stage in Black Patients

Lyme Disease Often Spotted at Later Stage in Black Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The tell-tale sign of Lyme disease is its bulls-eye rash, but that might be harder to spot in Black people, who are often diagnosed with more advanced disease than white people are, new research suggests.

The f...

12 Oct
Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

Just over a decade ago, the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) made many common cancer screenings free. But a pair of new studies caution that when those free tests turn up signs of trouble, important follow-up tests may be too pricey for some patients.

...

07 Oct
Are Breast Self-Exams Necessary? The Answer May Surprise You

Are Breast Self-Exams Necessary? The Answer May Surprise You

A shift in thinking means it's OK to skip your monthly breast self-exam — but don't miss your regular professional checkup and diagnostic imaging, health experts say.

A periodic visual check in a mirror can be helpful, breast health experts from the Cedars-Sinai health...

04 Oct
Colon Cancer Diagnoses Fell 40% in Pandemic, and That's Not Good News

Colon Cancer Diagnoses Fell 40% in Pandemic, and That's Not Good News

Colon cancer numbers dropped dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, but that doesn't mean fewer people have the disease.

In Spain, researchers discovered a more than 40% decline in colon cancer diagnoses, leading experts to worry about the ramifications.

"Thes...

30 Sep
Tracking Key Protein Helps Predict Outcomes in TBI Patients

Tracking Key Protein Helps Predict Outcomes in TBI Patients

When people suffer a severe head injury, it's hard to predict how they will fare in the long run. But a new study suggests that something fairly simple — measuring a protein in the blood — could help.

The protein, called neurofilament light (NfL), is a component of...

29 Sep
New Tests for Colon, Prostate Cancer Show Promise

New Tests for Colon, Prostate Cancer Show Promise

A pair of experimental tests could help doctors detect colon or prostate cancer with just a sample of blood or saliva.

One test examines a person's blood for four biomarkers linked to inflammation. In a small study, it outperformed the fecal blood test now used in colon ...

24 Sep
Can a Computer Program Help Docs Spot Breast Cancer?

Can a Computer Program Help Docs Spot Breast Cancer?

An artificial intelligence tool could help radiologists spot breast cancer on ultrasound images and reduce the need for extra testing, new research suggests.

"Our study demonstrates how artificial intelligence can help radiologists reading breast ultrasound exams to reve...

23 Sep
Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

Hispanic people in the United States have lower cancer rates than white people, but they are much more likely to develop certain preventable cancers.

"The good news is that overall cancer rates are lower in Hispanic people, but we are seeing very high rates of infectious...

21 Sep
4 Out of 10 Adults With No Known Heart Disease Have Fatty Hearts: Study

4 Out of 10 Adults With No Known Heart Disease Have Fatty Hearts: Study

Many middle-aged adults with apparently healthy hearts have a "silent" buildup of fatty deposits in their arteries, a large, new study shows.

Researchers found that of more than 25,000 50- to 64-year-olds, about 42% had signs of atherosclerosis — a buildup of "plaques"...

21 Sep
Doctors Often Miss Signs of Type 1 Diabetes in Kids

Doctors Often Miss Signs of Type 1 Diabetes in Kids

Potentially dangerous symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers, new research suggests.

In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate blood sugar used for ener...

16 Sep
Why Are More U.S. Babies Being Born With Syphilis?

Why Are More U.S. Babies Being Born With Syphilis?

The number of U.S. infants born with syphilis is climbing at an alarming pace, reaching a high not seen since the 1990s, according to new government figures.

Newborn syphilis, a potentially fatal condition, was at one time nearly eliminated in the United States. But the ...

15 Sep
Having Even a Cousin or Grandparent With Colon Cancer Raises Your Risk: Study

Having Even a Cousin or Grandparent With Colon Cancer Raises Your Risk: Study

Colon cancer risk runs in families, and it's not just a parent or sibling having had the disease that should concern you.

If you have a second- or third-degree relative who had colon cancer at an early age, your odds of having the disease substantially increase, a new st...

13 Sep
9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.

Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who to...

13 Sep
Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Helped Americans' Blood Pressure

Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Helped Americans' Blood Pressure

With the expansion of Medicaid under Obamacare, fewer Americans are uninsured and more are getting their blood pressure and blood sugar under control, a new study finds.

The gains are especially strong among Black and Hispanic patients, according to Boston University res...

13 Sep
Your State's Laws Might Save Your Life If Breast Cancer Strikes

Your State's Laws Might Save Your Life If Breast Cancer Strikes

When Nancy Cappello was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer in 2003, she was stunned.

How could this have happened? She went for her annual screening mammogram every year and was always told that all was fine.

It wasn't.

Cappello had dense breasts, but no ...

11 Sep
Child Cancers Are Rare, But Here Are Signs to Look For

Child Cancers Are Rare, But Here Are Signs to Look For

Most parents want their children to live carefree lives, so a diagnosis of childhood cancer is devastating. Fortunately, pediatric cancers are rare.

Yet it doesn't hurt to be watchful for the warning signs, suggest experts in childhood cancer from Penn State Health....

10 Sep
Black Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in Life

Black Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in Life

Black Americans and Mexican Americans typically develop type 2 diabetes up to seven years earlier than their white counterparts, a new study finds.

In all, more than 25% of adults in the two groups reported being diagnosed with diabetes before age 40, and 20% didn't know...

09 Sep
Sen. Amy Klobuchar Treated for Breast Cancer

Sen. Amy Klobuchar Treated for Breast Cancer

U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar revealed Thursday that she's been treated for early-stage breast cancer, including surgery to remove a lump and radiation therapy.

The 61-year-old Minnesota Democrat said

09 Sep
Mom-to-Be's 'Leaky' Heart Valves May Pose More Danger Than Thought

Mom-to-Be's 'Leaky' Heart Valves May Pose More Danger Than Thought

Leaky heart valves can put pregnant women at serious risk, according to a large study that runs counter to established practice.

The condition used to be considered relatively harmless during pregnancy. But this analysis by Johns Hopkins University researchers of more th...

31 Aug
Pandemic Brought Big Drop in Breast Cancer Screening in Older, Low-Income Women

Pandemic Brought Big Drop in Breast Cancer Screening in Older, Low-Income Women

Many parts of the United States saw a significant drop in breast cancer screening of older low-income women during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The analysis of data from 32 community health centers that serve low-income people found that breast cancer scree...

24 Aug
Expert Panel Lowers Routine Screening Age for Diabetes to 35

Expert Panel Lowers Routine Screening Age for Diabetes to 35

The recommended age to start screening overweight and obese people for diabetes will be lowered by five years from 40 to 35, the nation's leading panel of preventive health experts has announced.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has decided an earlier fiv...

22 Aug
Spotting the Signs of Deadly Melanoma Skin Cancers

Spotting the Signs of Deadly Melanoma Skin Cancers

Regular skin checks to look for signs of melanoma could save your life.

Self-exams for the deadliest type of skin cancer should be done at least once a month in a well-lit room in front of a full-length mirror and also with a hand mirror for hard-to-see areas, said Dr. A...

17 Aug
Working Night Shifts Could Raise Odds for A-Fib

Working Night Shifts Could Raise Odds for A-Fib

Long stints on the night shift could set you up for the dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation (a-fib), new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 283,000 people in the UK Biobank database, and found that those...

11 Aug
One Key Question Can Help Spot Skin Cancer

One Key Question Can Help Spot Skin Cancer

When a suspicious skin lesion sends you scurrying to a dermatologist, asking for a full-body skin check could save your life.

Dermatologists are twice as likely to find skin cancer with a full-body check, a new study reveals. More than half of the skin cancers discovere...

10 Aug
Incomplete Polyp Removal During Colonoscopy Can Bring Cancer Danger

Incomplete Polyp Removal During Colonoscopy Can Bring Cancer Danger

Colonoscopy screening can help prevent colon cancer by allowing doctors to find and remove potentially pre-cancerous growths called polyps. But if they fail to get the whole growth, the odds of a recurrence are high, a new study shows.

The likelihood that it will occur w...

08 Aug
6 Tips on Getting Back to Your Regular Doctor's Checkup

6 Tips on Getting Back to Your Regular Doctor's Checkup

Admit it, you've probably put off doctor visits whenever possible during the pandemic, and getting back on track with your health care is a daunting prospect.

Never fear, says an expert who offers some advice on resuming in-person health care visits.

The first...

06 Aug
At-Home Saliva Test Can Spot COVID Variants

At-Home Saliva Test Can Spot COVID Variants

Spit and scan. That's all you have to do, and in less than an hour, you can not only find out if you have COVID-19 but what variant you have, all without leaving your home.

This is the hope and promise of a new saliva-based COVID-19 test that is currently under developme...

04 Aug
Is It COVID? Early Signs May Differ by Age, Gender

Is It COVID? Early Signs May Differ by Age, Gender

Exactly what symptoms of early COVID-19 infection you suffer may depend on both your age and gender, a new study finds.

"As part of our study, we have been able to identify that the profile of symptoms due to COVID-19 differs from one group to another. This suggests that...

30 Jul
Deaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural America

Deaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural America

Death rates from Alzheimer's disease are particularly high in the rural United States, a preliminary study finds, highlighting a need for health care resources in traditionally under-served areas.

Researchers discovered that over the past two decades, rural areas in the ...

30 Jul
Seniors Rarely Discuss Their Drinking With Their Doctors

Seniors Rarely Discuss Their Drinking With Their Doctors

Plenty of seniors may struggle with problem drinking, but a new study shows that less than half of them discuss their alcohol use with their health care providers.

"Older adults are at high risk for the harms of alcohol use, especially for those with existing chronic dis...

22 Jul
Many Patients Billed for Preventive Care That Should Be Free: Study

Many Patients Billed for Preventive Care That Should Be Free: Study

Many Americans are being charged for preventive -- and supposedly free -- health care, new research shows, and those bills may keep them from booking appointments in the future.

Out-of-pocket charges for preventive care that should be free under the Affordable Care Act c...

20 Jul
Screening Often Misses Endometrial Cancer in Black Women

Screening Often Misses Endometrial Cancer in Black Women

A noninvasive method of screening for endometrial cancer often fails to detect signs of it in Black women, a new study says.

The findings raise questions about the use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) to determine the need for a biopsy in these patients, according to th...

19 Jul
Long Distance to Care Can Mean Worse Outcomes for Young Cancer Patients

Long Distance to Care Can Mean Worse Outcomes for Young Cancer Patients

Teens and young adults with cancer who live in rural areas or far from the hospital where they were diagnosed are more likely to have advanced cancer and more likely to die, new research shows.

"A number of studies have indicated that place of residence can influence can...

16 Jul
A Better Test to Help Spot Glaucoma?

A Better Test to Help Spot Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss in older people, and early detection can bring better treatment. Now, researchers in Australia say their experimental genetic test for glaucoma can identify 15 times more people at high risk for the disease compared to a current gene...

14 Jul
Pandemic Delays in Screening Mean More Breast Cancer Deaths Ahead: Study

Pandemic Delays in Screening Mean More Breast Cancer Deaths Ahead: Study

The COVID-19 pandemic could leave a grim legacy for women's health.

New research suggests that disruptions in breast cancer screening and treatment in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to an increase in deaths from the disease.

While mammogr...

12 Jul
Most Cancer Screenings Make Big Rebound After Pandemic Decline

Most Cancer Screenings Make Big Rebound After Pandemic Decline

A major U.S. hospital system had a strong rebound in most cancer screening tests after a steep drop-off in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study shows.

The findings are based on an analysis of data from the Boston-based Mass General Brigham system. ...

09 Jul
Adding MRI to Screening Can Cut Prostate Cancer Overdiagnosis in Half

Adding MRI to Screening Can Cut Prostate Cancer Overdiagnosis in Half

One of the big issues in prostate cancer care is overdiagnosis -- men who are treated for low-risk, slow-growing tumors that might be better left monitored and untreated.

Now, research out of Sweden suggests that having patients undergo MRI screening, along with target...

08 Jul
U.S. Deaths From Cancer Continue to Decline

U.S. Deaths From Cancer Continue to Decline

Americans' overall death rate from cancer continues to fall -- but rising rates of certain cancers and ongoing racial disparities linger.

Those are among the findings of an annual report to the nation from several major cancer organizations.

The good news includes ...

02 Jul
Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

Many women in the United States aren't screened for cervical cancer because they can't afford it, a new study finds.

Screening helps reduce cervical cancer cases and deaths, but disparities in screening rates exist based on income, insurance status, race and ethnicity.

30 Jun
Women's Cancer Screenings Plummeted During Pandemic

Women's Cancer Screenings Plummeted During Pandemic

Breast and cervical cancer screenings dropped sharply among low-income minority women during the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

That could lead to delayed cancer diagnoses, health consequences and an increase in existing disp...

30 Jun
Gene Differences Could Have Black Patients Undergoing Unnecessary Biopsies

Gene Differences Could Have Black Patients Undergoing Unnecessary Biopsies

A gene variant may be driving high rates of unnecessary bone marrow biopsies in Black Americans, researchers say.

The variant is responsible for lower white blood cell levels in some healthy Black people, the investigators said.

"We've essentially created this raci...

28 Jun
Could Home Test for Colon Cancer Mean a Big Medical Bill to Come?

Could Home Test for Colon Cancer Mean a Big Medical Bill to Come?

You decide to take a popular colon cancer screening test that can be performed at home, and it comes back positive. A follow-up colonoscopy is scheduled, but then you suddenly receive a large and unexpected medical bill.

That's what happened to a Missouri woman who was ...

28 Jun
Most Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: Study

Most Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: Study

Most Americans with dementia are undiagnosed, which shows how important it is to screen and assess seniors for the disease, researchers say.

Their new analysis of data from a nationwide survey of about 6 million Americans aged 65 and older revealed that 91% of people wit...

25 Jun
Could a DNA Blood Test Spot a Range of Hidden Cancers?

Could a DNA Blood Test Spot a Range of Hidden Cancers?

Could a new one-and-done blood test designed to detect as many as 50 different types of cancer become a diagnostic game changer?

Yes, say researchers, who report the method appears accurate and reliable at identifying and locating cancer, including some kinds for which t...

21 Jun
Screen All Kids for Heart Problems, Pediatricians' Group Says

Screen All Kids for Heart Problems, Pediatricians' Group Says

All children should be screened for conditions that may put them at risk for cardiac arrest or death, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement recommends.

The screening should be done whether or not kids play sports, and it is particularly important as...

21 Jun
5 Tests You Should Not Order for a Child With Autism

5 Tests You Should Not Order for a Child With Autism

A leading medical group is offering testing guidelines for children with autistic behaviors.

The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Environmental Health emphasized that certain measurements to test for exposure to chemicals are not helpful to guide treatment. The...

18 Jun
On Father's Day, Give Dad Tips to Keep Healthy

On Father's Day, Give Dad Tips to Keep Healthy

Men tend to put their health care last, but Penn State Health offers some tips this Father's Day for ensuring guys stay healthy in the future.

"Men tend to take care of their cars more frequently than they do themselves. But when men wait to see the doctor once their 'ch...

18 Jun
Many 'High-Risk' Americans Unconcerned About Skin Cancer: Poll

Many 'High-Risk' Americans Unconcerned About Skin Cancer: Poll

It's long been known the sun's rays can cause skin cancer.

But a new poll shows that only about 30% of American adults say they're concerned about developing skin cancer -- even though nearly 70% have at least one risk factor for the disease.

The American Academy o...

08 Jun
Think You Can Skip That Annual Physical?  Think Again

Think You Can Skip That Annual Physical?  Think Again

Despite calls from some leading health experts to scrap annual physicals because they are a waste of time and money, a new study finds advantages to routine screenings.

"While it is disappointing that I can't tell my patients a visit with me or my colleagues will help th...

06 Jun
Your Doctor Appointments Might Look Different Post-Pandemic

Your Doctor Appointments Might Look Different Post-Pandemic

If it's been a while since you've seen your doctor, it may be time to schedule a visit to catch up on preventive health screenings or discuss any health concerns and chronic medical conditions.

During the 15 months since people began quarantining, many have avoide...

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