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Health Videos - 9

Women with an Optimistic Outlook Live Significantly Longer, Study Finds

Women with a positive mindset have a greater chance of living beyond the age of 90, researchers say.

Binge Drinking on the Rise in Adults, Study Warns

Moderate drinkers who binge alcohol are more likely to develop alcohol-related problems than moderate drinkers who don’t binge, researchers find.

Researchers Discover the Secret to Getting Kids to Eat Veggies

Children are more eager to try new vegetables when offered a fun reward, study finds.

Emotional Eating Starts Young and Is a Learned Behavior, Study Finds

Emotional eating can start as early as preschool and may be shaped by a mother’s eating habits, researchers say.

Why Are People Kinder as They Get Older?

A new study finds the brain releases more oxytocin as we age, which makes us kinder and more satisfied with life.

Childhood Lead Exposure Linked to Abnormal Stress Response and Behavior Problems, New Studies Find

Early childhood exposure to lead is associated with a dysregulated heart rate during stressful events, researchers say.

Binge-Watching TV Increases Risk of Blood Clots, New Study Finds

Prolonged television viewing ups the risk of blood clots regardless of physical activity, BMI and age, researchers say.

Do Lockdowns Really Keep People at Home?

While lockdowns are initially effective, a new study finds people start heading out within weeks due to lockdown fatigue.

Does ‘Baby Talk’ Really Help Your Baby Learn to Speak?

Baby talk may be a key component in helping babies form words, researchers say.

Health News Results - 586

03 Oct
Not All Kids With Autism Will Benefit From Therapy Dogs

Not All Kids With Autism Will Benefit From Therapy Dogs

For many kids with autism, Rhett, a black Labrador retriever, has been a calming and comforting influence in his seven years as a therapy dog.

But parents shouldn't assume that a service pooch is the solution for every child on the

30 Aug
The Most Common Form of Bullying Isn't Physical or Verbal

The Most Common Form of Bullying Isn't Physical or Verbal

The most widespread form of bullying isn't physical acts like pushing or kicking, nor is it verbal threats or derogatory remarks. Far and away bullies' top tactic is social exclusion.

Also known as "relational aggression," this involves shutting out peers from group acti...

26 Aug
Hate Listening to People Chewing? You Might Have Misophonia

Hate Listening to People Chewing? You Might Have Misophonia

Most people have cherished memories of their grandparents reading to them as children.

Ekaterina Pesheva's memories are quite different.

"I remember distinctly being very irritated and very angry listening to my grandmother reading children's books to me, like fair...

24 Aug
People Underestimate Impact of Random Acts of Kindness

People Underestimate Impact of Random Acts of Kindness

Buying someone a cup of coffee might seem like no big deal, but a new study shows that small acts of kindness have a bigger impact than people believe.

In a series of experiments, researchers found that those on the rec...

24 Aug
'News Addiction' Is Common and Can Harm Your Mental Health

'News Addiction' Is Common and Can Harm Your Mental Health

From the COVID-19 pandemic and the spread of monkeypox to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, school shootings and devastating wildfires, there's been no lack of doom and gloom lately, and many folks are glued to the news.

For more than 16% of people, however, compulsive ne...

24 Aug
Poor Sleep Can Make Folks Selfish, Study Finds

Poor Sleep Can Make Folks Selfish, Study Finds

The health risks of losing sleep are well known, ranging from heart disease to depression, but who knew that too little sleep can also make you selfish?

That's the takeaway of new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

"This new work demonstrates tha...

23 Aug
Too Much TV Time May Really Harm Your Brain

Too Much TV Time May Really Harm Your Brain

Older adults who get a lot of "screen time" may have an increased risk of developing dementia — but a lot depends...

23 Aug
Unrelated Folks Who Look Alike Share Similar DNA

Unrelated Folks Who Look Alike Share Similar DNA

A person's unrelated lookalike, commonly known as a doppelganger, may actually share genes that affect not only how they appear, but also their behavior.

In a new study, scientists did DNA analysis on 32 sets of virtual twins — people with strong facial similarities ...

23 Aug
Dogs Do Cry When Reunited With Owners

Dogs Do Cry When Reunited With Owners

Humans and dogs undoubtedly share a powerful bond, but can dogs cry when overcome with emotion?

According to a recent study, possibly the first to try to answer that questi...

12 Aug
Everyday Activities That Can Cut Your Odds for Dementia

Everyday Activities That Can Cut Your Odds for Dementia

Reading, doing yoga and spending time with family and friends might help lower your risk of dementia, a new study suggests.

"Previous studies have shown that leisure activities were associated wi...

02 Aug
Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.

And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a

28 Jul
Does Your Cat Play Well With Others? Hormones Might Be Why

Does Your Cat Play Well With Others? Hormones Might Be Why

While cats often prefer to be alone and closely guard their territory, some seem to thrive on togetherness even at a crowded shelter.

Chalk it up to chemistry.

That's the takeaway of a

26 Jul
More Evidence Fitness Trackers Can Boost Your Health

More Evidence Fitness Trackers Can Boost Your Health

Your fitness tracker, pedometer or smartwatch may motivate you to exercise more and lose weight, Australian researchers say.

In a large research review, the ...

19 Jul
Americans Are Getting Better at Cooperating With Strangers

Americans Are Getting Better at Cooperating With Strangers

American society may seem more fractured than ever, but cooperation among total strangers has been on the upswing for decades, researchers in China say.

Their conclusion emerged from ...

13 Jul
Can Anxiety Disorders Pass From Parent to Child?

Can Anxiety Disorders Pass From Parent to Child?

From the ongoing pandemic and the monkeypox outbreak to the charged political landscape, New York City mom and entrepreneur Lyss Stern has been increasingly anxious.

Stern worries that she will pass all of this fretting down to her 8-year-old daughter, and a new study su...

12 Jul
Friends Want to Hear From You More Than You Think

Friends Want to Hear From You More Than You Think

If you've ever hesitated to text or email friends you haven't seen in a while, a new study has a reassuring message: They'll probably appreciate it more than you think.

In a series of experiments involving nearly 6,000 adults, researchers found that, in general, people u...

12 Jul
Being Social May Be Key to 'Sense of Purpose' as You Age

Being Social May Be Key to 'Sense of Purpose' as You Age

Want to feel you matter after you retire? Start socializing, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis found that positive connections with other people were associated with a sense of purposefulness in older adults.

Having a

11 Jul
Gardening Can Blossom Into Better Mental Health

Gardening Can Blossom Into Better Mental Health

If you are feeling stressed and depressed, new research suggests that grabbing a trowel and getting your hands dirty may improve your mood.

Researchers found that tending to plants can reap mental ...

06 Jul
Age Big Factor in COVID Vaccine Views

Age Big Factor in COVID Vaccine Views

Your age may play a huge role in whether you'll decide to get a COVID vaccine, new research finds.

Though vaccine hesitancy due to personal politics has drawn a lot of media attention, a University of Georgia

28 Jun
Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male o...

28 Jun
More Evidence Uber, Lyft Are Reducing Drunk Driving Crashes

More Evidence Uber, Lyft Are Reducing Drunk Driving Crashes

Using ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft can reduce the number of impaired drivers on the roads, potentially leading to fewer alcohol-related crashes, a new research review confirms.

Review author Christopher Morrison, who studies drinking and the problems it sp...

27 Jun
Muting Your Phone May Cause More Stress, Not Less

Muting Your Phone May Cause More Stress, Not Less

Are you plagued by FOMO -- "fear of missing out"? Then silencing your smartphone may not be the stress-buster you think it is.

That's the takeaway from a new study that found many folks check their ph...

24 Jun
Smells Like Friendship: Similar Body Odors May Draw Folks Together

Smells Like Friendship: Similar Body Odors May Draw Folks Together

You and your best friend may have your noses to thank in helping bring you together, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that pairs of friends who'd just "clicked" upon meeting tended to smell more alike, compared to random pairs of strangers. What's more, a high-tec...

20 Jun
Squeaky or Furry: New Insights Into Dogs' Love of Toys

Squeaky or Furry: New Insights Into Dogs' Love of Toys

What goes through your dog's mind when you tell him to find his favorite toy?

Hungarian researchers say Fido relies on a mental image based on sensory features. Dogs call to mind the way that toy looks, feels and smells.

The finding - from the Family Dog Project at...

17 Jun
Sleep Throughout the Lifespan: When You Get Best, Worst Slumber

Sleep Throughout the Lifespan: When You Get Best, Worst Slumber

Americans are night owls at age 20, get the least sleep at 40, and then finally get more shut-eye after retirement.

Those are among the key takeaways from a study that looked at the sleep patterns of Americans of all ages. In short, teenagers and young adults often fall ...

16 Jun
Flu Shots Lag in States With Low COVID Vaccine Uptake

Flu Shots Lag in States With Low COVID Vaccine Uptake

Adult flu shots have slumped in states with low COVID-19 vaccination rates, suggesting that COVID-19 vaccination behavior may have spilled over to flu-vaccine behavior, new research indicates.

University of California, Los Angeles researchers point to declining trust in ...

16 Jun
Youth Drinking, Pot Use Went Down During Pandemic

Youth Drinking, Pot Use Went Down During Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic changed kids' lives in many respects, and sometimes for the better. Pot use, drinking, smoking and vaping all fell among U.S. youth, likely because they had to spend more time at home and less time with their friends, researchers say.

The findings a...

15 Jun
High Hopes: Optimism Helps Women Live Longer

High Hopes: Optimism Helps Women Live Longer

The key to a long life may be your attitude.

Researchers at Harvard studied the impact of optimism on women's lifespans, finding that optimism was associated with greater longevity, such as living past age 90.

Lead study author Hayami Koga, a PhD candidate at the H...

14 Jun
Bitter or Savory, Taste Genes Could Influence Your Diet

Bitter or Savory, Taste Genes Could Influence Your Diet

People who have never outgrown an aversion to broccoli, or an addiction to potato chips, can place part of the blame on their genes, preliminary research suggests.

The study, of over 6,200 adults, turned up correlations between certain taste-related genes and people's pr...

14 Jun
Americans Think They Eat Healthier Than They Really Do

Americans Think They Eat Healthier Than They Really Do

Many people think they make healthy food choices, but they may be viewing their diet through rose-colored glasses.

That's the main finding of a new study that aimed to identify disconnects between how healthfully Americans think they eat and how they actually do.

"...

14 Jun
Why Getting Along in Preschool Is So Important

Why Getting Along in Preschool Is So Important

The expression "plays well with others" is often tossed around to describe people who are less likely to ruffle feathers, and new research shows these sandbox skills really matter.

It turns out that kids who play well with others in preschool are less likely to experienc...

13 Jun
Teens May Have Eaten Healthier During Pandemic

Teens May Have Eaten Healthier During Pandemic

Of all the health harms the pandemic brought, new research has uncovered one positive effect: For the first time in 30 years, teens' consumption of junk food fell follo...

03 Jun
Gruesome Warnings on Cigarette Packs Have Smokers Hiding Them, but not Quitting

Gruesome Warnings on Cigarette Packs Have Smokers Hiding Them, but not Quitting

Graphic images on cigarette packs of diseased body parts and other smoking horrors may not have the desired effect on smokers themselves, a new study finds.

Many smokers kept cigarette packs with gruesome warning images hidden, but the images didn't have a lasting effect...

25 May
Limiting TV to Under 1 Hour a Day Could Slash Heart Disease Rates: Study

Limiting TV to Under 1 Hour a Day Could Slash Heart Disease Rates: Study

It's tempting to binge-watch TV shows, and it might be hard to get off the couch after just one or two episodes.

But it could be worth it.

Researchers calculated that if people committed to watching just under an hour of TV a day, 11% of

20 May
Restful Night's Sleep More Likely for Men Than Women

Restful Night's Sleep More Likely for Men Than Women

For many women, having it all may mean forgoing a decent night's sleep.

Women in the United States are less likely to get a good night's sleep and more likely to report daytime sleepiness ...

19 May
A Lover's Embrace May Calm Women More Than Men

A Lover's Embrace May Calm Women More Than Men

Is an upcoming final exam or big-time job interview stressing you out?

Hug your honey.

That's the takeaway from new research that showed how embracing your significant other can help calm women.

But sorry, guys, the same isn't true for you, according to the ...

18 May
Folks Choose Healthier Foods When Around 'Outsiders'

Folks Choose Healthier Foods When Around 'Outsiders'

Will it be a cheeseburger or a salad? What will they think of me?

A new study finds you're more likely to choose to eat healthy if you're with an "outsider" because you don't want them to have a poor opinion of you.

The study consisted of a

16 May
COVID Rules Don't Apply: Narcissists Shun Masks, Vaccines

COVID Rules Don't Apply: Narcissists Shun Masks, Vaccines

Narcissists' belief that it's 'all about them' can make them less likely to wear a mask or get vaccinated during the pandemic, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed data gathered from 1,100 U.S. adults in March 2021. They were asked about their mask use and vaccination...

11 May
Science Doesn't Always Boost Sales, Study Finds

Science Doesn't Always Boost Sales, Study Finds

Does science sell? Sometimes.

Using science to sell chocolate chip cookies and other yummy products is likely to backfire, a new study shows, but touting scientific research behind more practical, everyday items -- such as body wash -- can be an effective marketing strat...

06 May
Fooled by Fake News: Does Age Matter?

Fooled by Fake News: Does Age Matter?

Older adults are no more likely to believe fake news than younger adults, with the exception of the very oldest, a new study finds.

Falling for fake news can have significant physical, emotional and financial consequences, especially for older adults who may have their l...

05 May
You Let Your Cat Out - Where Does It Roam?

You Let Your Cat Out - Where Does It Roam?

Ever wonder where your cat wanders when you let it out? New research suggests your kitty most likely sticks close to home.

Scientists used GPS (global positioning system) to track the movements of nearly 100 pet cats in a small town in Eastern Norway when they were outsi...

29 Apr
Your Dog's Breed Has Little Influence on Behavior, Study Finds

Your Dog's Breed Has Little Influence on Behavior, Study Finds

For the past couple of centuries, humans have been breeding dogs to meet specific physical characteris...

29 Apr
Behavior Differences Led to High COVID Death Rate in U.S. South: Study

Behavior Differences Led to High COVID Death Rate in U.S. South: Study

Thousands of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. South could have been avoided if more people masked, social distanced, kept kids from school and made other behavioral changes to reduce the spread of the virus, researchers say.

In other words, if they had acted more like folks u...

28 Apr
Teens on TikTok: Fun, But Addictive and Maybe Harmful

Teens on TikTok: Fun, But Addictive and Maybe Harmful

In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

But what exactly do tho...

25 Apr
Hair of the Dog: A Quick, Painless Stress Test for Pooches

Hair of the Dog: A Quick, Painless Stress Test for Pooches

The strange smells and sounds at an animal shelter can stress out even the most placid pup, and invasive tests to see if they need medicine to calm down only add to the anxiety.

So there's some good news for Fido in

13 Apr
Family Structure Influences Teen Delinquency

Family Structure Influences Teen Delinquency

The structure of teens' families influences their risk of delinquent behaviors such as shoplifting, graffiti or robbery, new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed survey data gathered between 2016 and 2019 from more than 3,800 14- and 15-year-olds in...

04 Apr
Body & Mind: Rehab Psychologists Help When Illness, Injuries Strike

Body & Mind: Rehab Psychologists Help When Illness, Injuries Strike

If you're recovering from a significant injury or illness, a rehabilitation therapist could be a big help in getting back to your normal daily life, according to experts.

"You don't get a manual that comes with your injury that tells you how to navigate returning to your...

31 Mar
'Love Hormone' Turns Lions Into Placid Pussycats

'Love Hormone' Turns Lions Into Placid Pussycats

The "love hormone" oxytocin may be able to turn highly territorial lions into social sweethearts, researchers say.

Lions typically guard their turf fiercely, which can be a problem when they're on reserv...

28 Mar
Owners Can Play Big Role in Dogs' Problem Behaviors

Owners Can Play Big Role in Dogs' Problem Behaviors

Chasing light shimmers reflected onto a wall. Obsessive licking or chewing. Compulsive barking and whining. Pacing or tail chasing.

Nearly one in three pet dogs suffer from these

17 Mar
Studies Relying on Brain Scans Are Often Unreliable, Analysis Shows

Studies Relying on Brain Scans Are Often Unreliable, Analysis Shows

Most brain studies that rely on MRI scans don't include enough people to provide trustworthy results, researchers say.

These brain-wide association studies use MRI (magnetic resonance...

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