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Health Videos - 4

A Single Session Of Aerobic Exercise Can Make You Smarter

Researchers say even a two-minute workout may boost your brain power

Your Diet and Dementia Risk

Certain food combinations may be bad for the brain, new study finds.

Is A Bigger Brain Better?

Brain size doesn't always matter when it comes to aging and memory.

Short Bouts of Exercise May Help Save Your Memory

Just minutes of physical activity a day can protect your brain as you age.

Health News Results - 347

23 Sep
Diabetes Drug Metformin May Protect the Aging Brain

Diabetes Drug Metformin May Protect the Aging Brain

A common type 2 diabetes drug called metformin may have an unexpected, but positive, side effect: New research suggests that people taking the drug appear to have significantly slower declines in thinking and memory as they age.

"Our six-year study of older Australi...

22 Sep
Sleep Builds the Brain in the Early Years, Then Maintains It

Sleep Builds the Brain in the Early Years, Then Maintains It

For the very young, sleep builds and strengthens the brain, but it quickly switches to maintenance and repair before a child turns 3, new research shows.

Before about the age of 2½, the brain grows rapidly. And during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep a baby's brai...

21 Sep
Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Everyone needs sleep, but too little or too much of it might contribute to declines in thinking, a new study suggests.

Too little sleep was defined as four or fewer hours a night, while too much was deemed 10 or more hours a night. The ideal amount? Seven hours a ni...

17 Sep
A Good Workout Could Boost Your Thinking for Up to 2 Hours

A Good Workout Could Boost Your Thinking for Up to 2 Hours

A few minutes of moderate- to high-intensity aerobic activity -- like running or biking -- can boost young adults' memory and concentration for up to two hours, a new research review shows.

That's the takeaway from 13 studies published between 2009 and 2019. All look...

17 Sep
PTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia Risk

PTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia Risk

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)may significantly increase the risk of dementia later in life, according to a new study.

The researchers found that people with a history of PTSD were up to two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never had PTSD.<...

17 Sep
Smoking Ups Your Risk of a Fatal Brain Bleed

Smoking Ups Your Risk of a Fatal Brain Bleed

Smokers have a significantly raised risk of dying from a bleeding stroke, a new study warns.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from over 16,000 same-sex twin pairs in Finland. The twins were born before 1958 and followed for about 42 years (between 1976 and 20...

16 Sep
New Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's Risk

New Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's Risk

A genetic variant in some people may be associated with mental decline that can't be explained by deposits of two proteins linked with Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

They said their findings could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's.

The two prote...

10 Sep
Children Use Both Sides of the Brain to Understand Language

Children Use Both Sides of the Brain to Understand Language

Adults process language on one side of the brain, but kids use both hemispheres, a new study suggests.

The finding might explain why children recover more easily from brain injuries than adults, the study authors added.

"This is very good news for young ch...

03 Sep
Common Meds Tied to Faster Mental Decline in Seniors

Common Meds Tied to Faster Mental Decline in Seniors

A group of widely used medications might speed up older adults' mental decline -- especially if they are at increased risk of dementia, a new study hints.

The medications in question are called anticholinergics, and they are used to treat a diverse range of condition...

02 Sep
Each Day Sober Slowly Helps Alcoholics' Brains Recover

Each Day Sober Slowly Helps Alcoholics' Brains Recover

A new brain scan study shows why the "one day at a time" approach works for recovering alcoholics.

"For people with AUD [alcohol use disorder], the brain takes a long time to normalize, and each day is going to be a struggle," explained senior study author Rajita Sin...

28 Aug
Teen's Democratic Convention Speech Brings Awareness to Stuttering

Teen's Democratic Convention Speech Brings Awareness to Stuttering

On the final night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, the world heard from an improbable source -- a 13-year-old named Brayden Harrington.

Brayden was invited to speak because he has a frustrating and misunderstood condition that millions of Americans shar...

26 Aug
Rare 'Brain Vein' Strokes Are on the Rise

Rare 'Brain Vein' Strokes Are on the Rise

Most strokes strike when an artery in the brain suddenly becomes blocked, but new research shows a rarer cause of strokes is becoming more common.

It's called cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and it happens when a vein in the brain is clogged. While CVT is estimated...

26 Aug
Hearing Persists at End of Life, Brain Waves of Hospice Patients Show

Hearing Persists at End of Life, Brain Waves of Hospice Patients Show

Even if they appear unresponsive, dying people may still be able to hear.

That's the takeaway from a Canadian analysis of hospice patients in Vancouver.

Researchers compared electroencephalography (EEG) data -- a measure of electrical activity in the brain ...

20 Aug
Mediterranean Diet Might Lower Your Odds for Parkinson's

Mediterranean Diet Might Lower Your Odds for Parkinson's

People who eat healthfully may be less likely to develop a constellation of symptoms that can precede Parkinson's disease, a large new study suggests.

Researchers found that people who closely adhered to a Mediterranean-style diet were about one-third less likely to ...

19 Aug
Could Gene Therapy Stem the Damage of Parkinson's?

Could Gene Therapy Stem the Damage of Parkinson's?

It may be possible to protect Parkinson's patients' brains from further damage by turning off a "master regulator" gene, researchers report.

"One of the biggest challenges in treating Parkinson's, other than the lack of therapies that impede disease progression, is t...

14 Aug
Get Dizzy When Standing Up? It Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia

Get Dizzy When Standing Up? It Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia

Feeling woozy when you stand up may be a sign of an increased risk of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

Doctors call this feeling "orthostatic hypotension," and it occurs when there's a sudden drop in blood pressure as you stand, explained a team of researc...

12 Aug
Moms' Obesity May Affect Fetal Brain Development

Moms' Obesity May Affect Fetal Brain Development

Obesity during pregnancy may hinder fetal brain development, a new study suggests.

Development of brain areas involved in decision-making and behavior may be affected as early as the second trimester, New York University researchers said.

For the study, t...

12 Aug
Education Benefits the Brain Over a Lifetime

Education Benefits the Brain Over a Lifetime

A new study confirms what your parents always told you: Getting an education opens the door to career opportunities and higher salaries. But it may also benefit your well-being in old age.

"The total amount of formal education that people receive is related to their...

06 Aug
Are Baby Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?

Are Baby Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?

Aging baby boomers may not be as mentally sharp as their parents were, a new study suggests -- raising questions about what the pattern could mean for future dementia rates.

Looking at two decades' worth of data on U.S. adults, the study found generational difference...

05 Aug
New Drug May Beat Older One at Preventing MS Relapse

New Drug May Beat Older One at Preventing MS Relapse

A new injection drug can prevent multiple sclerosis flare-ups better than an existing medication, a clinical trial has found.

The drug, called ofatumumab, beat a standard MS medication in reducing patients' symptom relapses. It also slowed down the progression of the...

05 Aug
More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer's

More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer's

Among people who have the gene that carries a heightened risk for early-onset Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests that more education might slow the development of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain.

About 1% to 6% of people with Alzheimer's disease ha...

30 Jul
Under 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May Rise

Under 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May Rise

Need fresh motivation to lose some weight? New research suggests that young adults who are overweight or obese face a higher risk for dementia in their golden years.

For the study, the researchers looked at just over 5,100 older adults who were involved in two long-t...

29 Jul
Mastering the Violin Won't Help Your Child Master Math: Study

Mastering the Violin Won't Help Your Child Master Math: Study

All the parents who force their children to play an instrument because it has been touted as a way to boost overall intelligence, take note.

New research now suggests that it may not help develop memory, math, reading and writing skills after all.

Earlier s...

28 Jul
9/11 First Responders Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's: Study

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's: Study

First responders to the 9/11 terrorist attacks appear to be at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia, new research suggests.

The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild thinking impairments among them is well-known, and now two stud...

28 Jul
Smoking Raises Aneurysm Risk for Women

Smoking Raises Aneurysm Risk for Women

Smoking significantly increases a woman's risk of potentially deadly brain aneurysms, a new study warns.

An aneurysm is a weakened, bulging section of an artery. If an aneurysm ruptures, it can cause fatal bleeding.

The study included 545 women, aged 30 to ...

24 Jul
What Puts You at High Risk of Midlife Mental Decline?

What Puts You at High Risk of Midlife Mental Decline?

Your thinking skills may be at risk of declining in midlife if you smoke or have high blood pressure or diabetes, a new study suggests.

Heart disease risk factors -- especially high blood pressure and diabetes -- have become more common in midlife, the study authors...

22 Jul
Will Your Brain Stay Sharp Into Your 90s? Certain Factors Are Key

Will Your Brain Stay Sharp Into Your 90s? Certain Factors Are Key

Some people in their 90s stay sharp whether their brain harbors amyloid protein plaques -- a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease -- or not, but why?

That's the question researchers sought answers for among 100 people without dementia, average age 92, who were followed f...

21 Jul
Researchers Zero in on Alzheimer's Disease Risk Factors

Researchers Zero in on Alzheimer's Disease Risk Factors

Ten risk factors may affect your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new Chinese study suggests.

Focusing on these factors could help doctors develop guidelines for preventing Alzheimer's, researchers say. The risk factors include mental activity, obesity in l...

17 Jul
Check Early and Often for Glaucoma

Check Early and Often for Glaucoma

Regular eye checks are crucial for people with early-stage glaucoma, a new study shows.

Glaucoma is a condition in which the optic nerve that connects the eye to the brain becomes damaged. It develops slowly and affects peripheral vision first. Untreated glaucoma lea...

15 Jul
Smog Harms Women's Brains, But One Food May Help Buffer the Damage

Smog Harms Women's Brains, But One Food May Help Buffer the Damage

Dirty air is the curse of urban living, and studies have shown that breathing it in harms the brains of men and women alike.

But a new study suggests that diet can help reverse the damage: Older women who regularly ate fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids seemed to bette...

15 Jul
As People Age, They Share Fewer Memories With Others: Study

As People Age, They Share Fewer Memories With Others: Study

The older people get, the less likely they are to share memories, researchers say.

And when they do reminisce, older folks don't offer as much detail as younger adults do, new study findings show.

Over four days, University of Arizona researchers used a sma...

10 Jul
Terrifying Delirium Can Strike Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients

Terrifying Delirium Can Strike Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients

Intense breathing problems may be the most widely reported feature of COVID-19, but new research warns that coronavirus can also take aim at the brain.

Infection can trigger serious nerve damage, stroke, inflammation and even wild bouts of delirium.

In fact...

09 Jul
Blood Test May Reveal Concussion Severity With Accuracy of Spinal Tap

Blood Test May Reveal Concussion Severity With Accuracy of Spinal Tap

A simple blood test may predict the severity of a concussion as accurately as an invasive spinal tap, researchers report.

They focused on a biomarker called neurofilament light chain. This nerve protein can be detected in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid when nerve ...

07 Jul
Zika May Have Damaged More Infants' Brains Than Expected

Zika May Have Damaged More Infants' Brains Than Expected

It's a virus some might not even remember, but babies born to mothers infected with Zika who appeared normal at birth still experienced neurological or developmental problems, new research suggests.

A hallmark of infection with the mosquito-borne Zika virus in pregna...

30 Jun
Deep Brain Stimulation May Slow Parkinson's, Study Finds

Deep Brain Stimulation May Slow Parkinson's, Study Finds

Data from a five-year clinical trial is adding to growing evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can slow the ravages of Parkinson's disease.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., said that the therapy appears to curb any worsen...

30 Jun
Brain's Iron Stores May Be Key to Alzheimer's

Brain's Iron Stores May Be Key to Alzheimer's

The progression of Alzheimer's disease may accelerate as iron deposits build up in the brain, a new study finds, hinting at a possible role for the mineral in mental decline.

Using MRI scans of 200 older adults with and without Alzheimer's, researchers found that tho...

29 Jun
A Drink or Two a Day Might Be Good for Your Brain: Study

A Drink or Two a Day Might Be Good for Your Brain: Study

Love a glass of wine with dinner? There's good news for you from a study that finds "moderate" alcohol consumption -- a glass or two per day -- might actually preserve your memory and thinking skills.

This held true for both men and women, the researchers said.

...

26 Jun
Hormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in Women

Hormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in Women

Women have more Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain than men, and this may be linked to hormonal disruptions at menopause, researchers say.

"About two-thirds of people living with Alzheimer's are women, and the general thinking has been it's because wome...

26 Jun
Stroke, Confusion: COVID-19 Often Impacts the Brain, Study Shows

Stroke, Confusion: COVID-19 Often Impacts the Brain, Study Shows

Patients with severe COVID-19 may be at risk for a variety of brain complications -- from stroke to psychosis, new research suggests.

"There have been growing reports of an association between COVID-19 infection and possible neurological or psychiatric complications,...

25 Jun
Middle-Age Obesity Linked to Higher Odds for Dementia

Middle-Age Obesity Linked to Higher Odds for Dementia

If you've been looking for a good reason to slim down, consider this: Being obese at midlife appears to increase your odds for dementia.

That's the takeaway from a large study just published by British researchers, and it echoes similar findings published in December...

24 Jun
One-Time Treatment Eases Parkinson's -- in Mice

One-Time Treatment Eases Parkinson's -- in Mice

In findings that could pave the way to a new treatment for Parkinson's disease, scientists have figured out how to spur the production of new brain cells in mice.

The advance centers on a protein found in various cells in mice and humans. Researchers found that block...

22 Jun
Don't Be a 'Hot-Head': Study Suggests Head Overheating Impairs Thinking

Don't Be a 'Hot-Head': Study Suggests Head Overheating Impairs Thinking

Can working or playing in the hot sun "fry" your brain?

Yes, claims a new, small study that found too much heat on the head hampered thinking in volunteers.

Most people know that high temperatures can cause heat exhaustion or heat stroke as the body's core ...

17 Jun
COVID-19 Brings New Challenges to Alzheimer's Caregiving

COVID-19 Brings New Challenges to Alzheimer's Caregiving

Caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease comes with daily challenges and disruptions, and those have only increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the risk of infection, contact with your loved one may now be off-limits or severely restricted. Caregivers pr...

17 Jun
5 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

5 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

A combination of healthy habits -- such as a good diet and regular exercise -- may lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease by as much as 60%, a new study suggests.

Data from nearly 3,000 people in the United States was scored on five beneficial lifestyle factors: ...

17 Jun
Even Without Concussion, Athletes' Brains Can Change After Head Jolts: Study

Even Without Concussion, Athletes' Brains Can Change After Head Jolts: Study

Athletes who play contact sports may develop subtle brain changes -- even if they don't suffer a concussion, researchers say.

Their study involved 101 female college athletes -- 70 who played rugby and 31 who either rowed or swam. All were concussion-free six months ...

11 Jun
HIV Can Travel From the Brain, Animal Study Suggests

HIV Can Travel From the Brain, Animal Study Suggests

HIV can reside in brain cells and spread the AIDS-causing virus to the body, a new study in mice indicates.

It's known that HIV enters the brain within eight days of infection, but less is known about whether HIV-infected brain cells can release HIV that can then i...

04 Jun
Wristband 'Zapper' Might Help Calm Tourette Syndrome

Wristband 'Zapper' Might Help Calm Tourette Syndrome

A wristband that zaps a key nerve may help quell the uncontrollable tics of Tourette syndrome, according to British researchers.

"We think we've come up with a safe and effective piece of technology that we believe is relatively cheap that will give control over tic...

02 Jun
Maria Shriver and AARP Take on Alzheimer's in Women

Maria Shriver and AARP Take on Alzheimer's in Women

An Alzheimer's diagnosis is devastating, no matter your sex. But the disease strikes far more women than men.

Journalist and author Maria Shriver is determined to help researchers figure out why women make up two-thirds of those with Alzheimer's disease. And why cer...

27 May
Mindfulness May Ease the Emotional Burden of MS

Mindfulness May Ease the Emotional Burden of MS

Mindfulness training may help counter the thinking and emotional difficulties caused by multiple sclerosis.

In a small test study, people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had four weeks of mindfulness training emerged with better emotional control and faster thinking...

18 May
Healthier Heart, Better Brain in Old Age

Healthier Heart, Better Brain in Old Age

Preventing heart disease may protect you from dementia, researchers say.

The new study looked at nearly 1,600 people, at an average age of 79.5, who were followed for 21 years. Their heart disease risk was assessed at the outset, and participants had annual memory an...

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