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14 Jul

HealthDay Now: Are you being “gaslighted” by your doctor?

HealthDay’s Mabel Jong is joined by Dr. Christine Metz, professor and endometriosis researcher at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, and April Summerford, an endometriosis patient and advocate, to discuss the reasons why women are particularly vulnerable to medical gaslighting and what can be done if you find yourself in this situation.

14 Jul

HealthDay Now: Endometriosis Patients Face Medical “Gaslighting”

HealthDay’s Mabel Jong is joined by Dr. Christine Metz, professor and endometriosis researcher at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, and April Summerford, an endometriosis patient and advocate, to discuss the reasons why women are particularly vulnerable to medical gaslighting and what can be done if you find yourself in this situation.

13 Dec

Does ‘Baby Talk’ Really Help Your Baby Learn to Speak?

Baby talk may be a key component in helping babies form words, researchers say.

Health News Results - 265

02 Aug
Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.

And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a

02 Aug
9 in 10 Americans Want Their Health Info Kept Private

9 in 10 Americans Want Their Health Info Kept Private

More than 9 in 10 Americans believe that medical privacy is a right and the...

27 Jul
Alternative Medicine Popular Among Seniors, But Most Don't Tell Their Doctors About It

Alternative Medicine Popular Among Seniors, But Most Don't Tell Their Doctors About It

Lots of older folks are turning to alternative medicine to help them with the pains of aging – but they don’t necessarily think that...

21 Jul
Overworked Anesthesiologists Can Put Surgical Patients at Risk

Overworked Anesthesiologists Can Put Surgical Patients at Risk

Harried, overworked anesthesiologists could be raising hospital patients' risk of death and complications, a new study reports.

It's not uncommon to have one anesthesiologist directing the ...

19 Jul
Ob/Gyn Tests Stay Virtual Due to Fears Around COVID, Abortion Ruling

Ob/Gyn Tests Stay Virtual Due to Fears Around COVID, Abortion Ruling

In light of the Supreme Court's recent ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, many ob/gyns around the country are welcoming a change that allows them to continue taking accreditation exams virt...

19 Jul
Minority Students More Likely to Leave Medical School: Study

Minority Students More Likely to Leave Medical School: Study

Medical schools are doing a better job of

15 Jul
'Medical Gaslighting': Are You a Victim?

'Medical Gaslighting': Are You a Victim?

FRIDAY, July 15, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- As a teenager, April Summerford suffered from extremely painful periods that made her suspect something was wrong with her body.

Summerford didn't know it, but she had

12 Jul
Key Players in Keeping Kids Safe From Guns: Pediatricians

Key Players in Keeping Kids Safe From Guns: Pediatricians

Pediatricians may become the trusted middle men between gun owners and non-gun owners when it comes to talks about gun safety, a new study shows.

University of Pennsylvania researchers found parents were more open to politically sensitive discussions about gun locks and ...

11 Jul
When Hospital Patient & Doctor Speak Same Language, Outcomes Improve

When Hospital Patient & Doctor Speak Same Language, Outcomes Improve

It's already hard enough to understand all your doctor's technical talk -- now imagine speaking a whole other language on top of that.

Hospital patients who don't speak the same language as their doctor get worse care and are more likely to die, a

05 Jul
What Drives Doctors to Take Their Own Lives

What Drives Doctors to Take Their Own Lives

Doctor burnout and suicide are a growing concern, a new study finds.

"We often overlook the physical health of our health care workers, but poor health can lead to difficulty performing tasks at work, which then leads to job stress and mental health issues," said corresp...

28 Jun
Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male o...

27 Jun
Ob-Gyns Call Bans on Abortion Devastating for Women's Health

Ob-Gyns Call Bans on Abortion Devastating for Women's Health

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn a woman's right to have an abortion marks a "very dark day in health care" that will leave patients at risk and doctors afraid to act, lea...

15 Jun
Telemedicine Could Really Help People Battling Advanced Cancers

Telemedicine Could Really Help People Battling Advanced Cancers

As a bill that would expand Medicare coverage for telehealth services makes its way through the U.S. Senate, a new study of people with advanced cancer suggests the practice could impro...

13 May
Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to prim...

11 May
1 in 4 Hospital Physicians 'Mistreated' by Patients, Visitors

1 in 4 Hospital Physicians 'Mistreated' by Patients, Visitors

Nearly 1 in 4 hospital doctors are mistreated at work by patients, visitors and other doctors, and female doctors are nearly two times more ...

04 May
Bans on Affirmative Action Led to Fewer Black, Hispanic Doctors

Bans on Affirmative Action Led to Fewer Black, Hispanic Doctors

State bans on affirmative action have prompted a precipitous decline in the number of U.S. medical students from racial/ethnic minority groups, a new study finds.

"We know that a more divers...

02 May
Fewer U.S. Doctors Will Get Trained in Abortion if Roe v. Wade Overturned

Fewer U.S. Doctors Will Get Trained in Abortion if Roe v. Wade Overturned

There could be far fewer U.S. doctors trained to provide an abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned by the Supreme Court in a decision that is expected by the end of June, researchers report.

That's because nearly 45% of 286 obstetrics and gynecology residency programs acr...

28 Apr
Doctors Devise Safer Alternative to Opioids During, After Surgeries

Doctors Devise Safer Alternative to Opioids During, After Surgeries

It's been slightly more than a year since Jonathan Akindle, 23, underwent weight-loss surgery, and so far, so good.

He is now down 130 pounds, and he was ...

19 Apr
AI May Help Spot Relapse Risk in Alcoholics

AI May Help Spot Relapse Risk in Alcoholics

Artificial intelligence (AI) may be able to identify alcoholics at risk of relapsing after treatment, researchers say.

Patients often return to heavy drinking during and after treatment, and may require multiple tries before they can achieve long-term abstinence from

18 Apr
Health Care Workers Were At Highest COVID Risk in Workplace

Health Care Workers Were At Highest COVID Risk in Workplace

U.S. health care workers were most likely to be infected with COVID-19 at work during the pandemic's first year, according to a new study that challenges previous research suggesting their risk was highest off the job.

Researchers said

07 Apr
U.S. Medical Schools' Faculty Still Lack Diversity: Study

U.S. Medical Schools' Faculty Still Lack Diversity: Study

U.S. medical schools are not keeping pace with a nation that is more racially and ethnically diverse every day, a new study reports.

The schools' clinical faculty and leadership are not as diverse as

05 Apr
As Pandemic Evolved, U.S. Hospitals Learned Quickly How to Care for Patients

As Pandemic Evolved, U.S. Hospitals Learned Quickly How to Care for Patients

While hospitals and clinics are known for being slow to turn new evidence into actual practice, they picked up the pace during the pandemic.

A research team led by scientists from Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and the University of California, San Francisco...

31 Mar
New Way to Blast Kidney Stones Can Be Done in Doctor's Office

New Way to Blast Kidney Stones Can Be Done in Doctor's Office

A noninvasive ultrasound technique is capable of quickly pulverizing kidney stones, an early study shows - in what researchers call a first step toward a simpler, anesthesia-free treatment for the painful problem.

The study reports on the first 19 patients who've had kid...

22 Mar
Ultrasounds, Exams Unnecessary Before Receiving Abortion Pill: Study

Ultrasounds, Exams Unnecessary Before Receiving Abortion Pill: Study

Women can safely use abortion pills without first getting ultrasound scans, or having an in-person medical appointment at all, a new study confirms.

For more than 20 years, U.S. women have had access to medication abortions for ending early pregnancies, using the drugs m...

21 Mar
U.S. Health Officials Faced Widespread Harassment During Pandemic

U.S. Health Officials Faced Widespread Harassment During Pandemic

Harassment of U.S. public health officials and departments was rampant during the COVID-19 pandemic and led some officials to quit, researchers say.

Their analysis of survey resp...

18 Mar
Diversity Still Elusive in America's Medical Schools

Diversity Still Elusive in America's Medical Schools

U.S. medical schools have a disproportionate number of wealthy students, which hinders attempts to improve diversity among U.S. docto...

09 Mar
Upcoming Surgery Worry You? Poll Says You're Not Alone

Upcoming Surgery Worry You? Poll Says You're Not Alone

Many older Americans have concerns about elective surgery beforehand, but most who go through with it are satisfied with the outcome, a new survey finds.

Elect...

07 Mar
Apps: They Help Manage Health Conditions, But Few Use Them, Poll Finds

Apps: They Help Manage Health Conditions, But Few Use Them, Poll Finds

Health and fitness apps are growing in popularity, but not among the people who might benefit most from them - seniors and people with chronic health conditions.

Nearly two out of three American adults are living with a chronic health problem like heart disease,...

03 Mar
Telemedicine Helped Many MS Patients During Pandemic

Telemedicine Helped Many MS Patients During Pandemic

Telemedicine was widely used by Americans with multiple sclerosis (MS) during the pandemic, and many were happy with the results, a new study finds.

"The findings suggest that telehealth services were well liked d...

01 Mar
Alexa Will Soon Put Users in Touch With Telehealth Doctors

Alexa Will Soon Put Users in Touch With Telehealth Doctors

Alexa can already play your favorite song or tell you whether it is going to rain, but soon you may also be able to tell the popular voice assistant to contact a doctor for health issues.

The service from Amazon and telemedicine provider

16 Feb
Many Who Postponed Health Care During COVID Are Still Waiting

Many Who Postponed Health Care During COVID Are Still Waiting

In a sign that the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on routine health care, many of the nearly one-third of older Americans who had a medical procedure, primary care visit or dental appointment canceled or postponed due to COVID still haven't received that care, a new poll fi...

07 Feb
Drills Key to Making Dental Appointments COVID-Safe

Drills Key to Making Dental Appointments COVID-Safe

The type of drill your dentist uses just might determine your chances of catching COVID-19 while in the chair.

So claims new research that suggests dentists can significantly improve patient s...

04 Feb
Most Vaccine-Hesitant Health Care Workers Change Their Minds, Study Shows

Most Vaccine-Hesitant Health Care Workers Change Their Minds, Study Shows

Most health care workers at a large U.S. hospital who initially refused COVID-19 vaccines eventually went and got their shots, new research reveals.

"

26 Jan
Omicron Batters Already Strained U.S. Hospitals

Omicron Batters Already Strained U.S. Hospitals

U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the v...

19 Jan
Crowded Emergency Rooms Cost Lives: Study

Crowded Emergency Rooms Cost Lives: Study

A seemingly endless wait in an emergency department can be taxing for many reasons, but new research suggests that long delays in being admitted to the hospital may even raise a patient's risk of death within the following 30 days.

Why? One possible reason: A crowded ER ...

17 Jan
Insurance Often Covers Ivermectin for COVID, Even Though Drug Doesn't Work

Insurance Often Covers Ivermectin for COVID, Even Though Drug Doesn't Work

U.S. insurers are paying millions of dollars a year to cover the cost of ivermectin for COVID-19 patients despite a lack of proof the anti-parasitic drug is effective against the virus, a new study finds.

Both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the World Health Or...

13 Jan
Surge of U.S. Military Medical Personnel to Ease Medical Worker Shortages

Surge of U.S. Military Medical Personnel to Ease Medical Worker Shortages

President Joe Biden plans to announce Thursday that a "surge" of U.S. military medical personnel will soon be deployed to hospitals struggling with staff shortages amid soaring COVID-19 cases.

More than 1,000 will begin arriving at hospitals nationwide starting next week...

10 Jan
Many Doctors Uninformed on Rights of Disabled Patients

Many Doctors Uninformed on Rights of Disabled Patients

More than 30 years after passage of the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), many doctors still don't know how to provide accessible care, a new study finds.

"Despite the fact people with disabilities comprise 25% of the population, they often confront barrier...

15 Dec
Too Many Fertility Specialists Still Use a Painful, Useless Procedure: Study

Too Many Fertility Specialists Still Use a Painful, Useless Procedure: Study

Couples struggling to conceive a child through in vitro fertilization (IVF) sometimes are offered an often-painful procedure known as "scratching the womb" as a desperate last hope to get pregnant.

As many as one-third of IVF clinics offer the practice in Australia, New ...

13 Dec
Poor Outcome More Likely When Patient Is Female, Surgeon Is Male: Study

Poor Outcome More Likely When Patient Is Female, Surgeon Is Male: Study

You can't always choose who operates on you, especially in an emergency, but the sex of your surgeon shouldn't matter, should it?

It just may, according to a

09 Dec
Who Gets a Flu Shot? Having a Doctor Is Key

Who Gets a Flu Shot? Having a Doctor Is Key

Public health experts have long recommended getting a seasonal flu shot, but a new study suggests there's hesitancy about that vaccine, too. Physicians and pharmacists can play a key role in flu shot uptake, the research shows.

Only about 44% of people who had a health c...

02 Dec
Pandemic Stress, Exhaustion Weigh on Health Care Workers

Pandemic Stress, Exhaustion Weigh on Health Care Workers

The pandemic is taking a toll on health care workers' sleep, which can put both their mental health and patient care at risk, researchers warn.

Their study of more than 800 New York City health care workers found that compared to those with no sleep problems, those with...

24 Nov
1 in 5 Avoided Health Care During Pandemic, Study Finds

1 in 5 Avoided Health Care During Pandemic, Study Finds

One in five adults avoided seeking health care during the COVID-19 pandemic, even when they had symptoms suggesting the need for urgent medical attention, according to researchers in the Netherlands.

"Health care avoidance during COVID-19 may be prevalent amongst those w...

23 Nov
Biden Plan Will Spend $1.5 Billion to Boost Health Worker Supply

Biden Plan Will Spend $1.5 Billion to Boost Health Worker Supply

Vice President Kamala Harris announced Monday that the Biden administration will spend $1.5 billion to tackle a health care worker shortage in underserved communities.

The money from the COVID-19 recovery program, called the American Rescue Plan, and other sources will g...

18 Nov
Across America, Black People Have Worse Health Outcomes

Across America, Black People Have Worse Health Outcomes

Race-based gaps in health care and health outcomes persist in every region of the United States, a new state-by-state report card shows.

Racial and ethnic disparities woven throughout America and its system of health care mean that people of color are more likely to die ...

17 Nov
HPV Vaccination Rises in States That Don't Require Parental Consent

HPV Vaccination Rises in States That Don't Require Parental Consent

When young people are allowed to give their own consent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, vaccination rates are higher, new research shows.

The new study suggests that allowing teens to consent without parental involvement could be an important strategy for boosti...

16 Nov
Better Work Conditions Bringing Better Mental Health to Resident Doctors: Study

Better Work Conditions Bringing Better Mental Health to Resident Doctors: Study

Medical training may be taking less of a mental health toll on young doctors than it used to, but depression remains common, a new study suggests.

Medical residency -- the training that new doctors undergo at hospitals or clinics -- is infamous for its grueling schedule,...

11 Nov
Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

"During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagu...

03 Nov
Pandemic Has Stressed Out Doctors

Pandemic Has Stressed Out Doctors

It's a finding that stands to reason: A new study shows the pandemic has triggered anxiety and depression in many doctors.

Researchers used surveys to assess the mental health of more than 5,000 doctors in Spain, Italy and the United Kingdom at two points during the pand...

02 Nov
Almost 1 in 3 U.S. Seniors Now Sees at Least 5 Doctors Per Year

Almost 1 in 3 U.S. Seniors Now Sees at Least 5 Doctors Per Year

Nearly one-third of older U.S. adults visit at least five different doctors each year -- reflecting the growing role of specialists in Americans' health care, a new study finds.

Over the past 20 years, Americans on Medicare have been increasingly seeing specialists, rese...

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