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Health News Results - 333

15 Aug
U.S. Nursing Homes Are Understaffed, But Minority Communities Have It Worst

U.S. Nursing Homes Are Understaffed, But Minority Communities Have It Worst

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Staffing shortages at nursing homes across the United States are severe in disadvantaged areas where needs may be greatest, researchers say.

The study — recently published in the

15 Aug
Unpaid Time Off Work Rose 50% During Pandemic

Unpaid Time Off Work Rose 50% During Pandemic

U.S. workers without paid leave lost out on an estimated $28 billion in wages during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report.

The ...

03 Aug
8/8 -- Inflation Has Many Americans Cutting Back on Health Care, Poll Finds

8/8 -- Inflation Has Many Americans Cutting Back on Health Care, Poll Finds

Inflation is putting Americans' health at risk, with nearly 2 in 5 struggling to pay for the care they need, according to a new West Health-Gallup poll.

About 38% -- which translates to an estimated 98 million Americans -- said rising health care prices had caused them t...

03 Aug
Neighborhood May Affect a Couple's Odds of Conceiving

Neighborhood May Affect a Couple's Odds of Conceiving

Where you live may affect your fertility, a new study suggests.

People who live in economically deprived neighborhoods are about 20% less likely...

03 Aug
Financial Struggles Can Be Tough on Families, And Tough to Explain to Kids

Financial Struggles Can Be Tough on Families, And Tough to Explain to Kids

Financial pressures may have made this a year when some families can’t afford pricy extras, such as after-school activities or summer camp.

It’s OK to explain this to your kids, said an expert from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who offered tips for the conve...

27 Jul
PFAS 'Forever Chemicals' Cost the U.S. Billions

PFAS 'Forever Chemicals' Cost the U.S. Billions

They are called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the human body and can contribute to the risk of everything from cancer to childhood obesity.

Now, new research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (

08 Jul
Inflation Has Americans' Anxiety Levels Surging: Poll

Inflation Has Americans' Anxiety Levels Surging: Poll

Nearly all Americans are worried about inflation as economic worries oust COVID-19 as the nation's top source of stress, a new poll reveals.

Nearly nine out of 10 Americans (...

15 Jun
Kids' Access to Insulin Pumps: Race, Income Matters

Kids' Access to Insulin Pumps: Race, Income Matters

Overall use of insulin pumps among U.S. youngsters with type 1 diabetes has climbed in recent decades, but those who are poor or from minority groups are less likely to have the devices, a new study finds.

10 Jun
Malnutrition Can Also Trigger Diabetes, Affecting Millions Worldwide

Malnutrition Can Also Trigger Diabetes, Affecting Millions Worldwide

A form of diabetes caused by malnutrition is significantly different from type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be considere...

23 May
Lower Incomes May Mean Lower Survival After Heart Attack

Lower Incomes May Mean Lower Survival After Heart Attack

If you're poor and have a severe type of heart attack, the chance you'll live through it is significantly lower than that of someone with more money, new research shows.

The finding

16 May
When Abortion Means Traveling, More Women Forgo Procedure: Study

When Abortion Means Traveling, More Women Forgo Procedure: Study

Long-distance travel will likely prove a nearly insurmountable barrier to some women seeking abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned as expected, a new study concludes.

Women who need an abortion are more than twice as likely to delay the procedure or decide to continue th...

12 May
How Empty Cupboards Can Raise Diabetes Risk

How Empty Cupboards Can Raise Diabetes Risk

Young adults who struggle to afford food face an increased risk of diabetes later in life, possibly due...

28 Apr
Race, Income Can Be Roadblocks to Recovery From Depression

Race, Income Can Be Roadblocks to Recovery From Depression

If you're battling depression, the success of your treatment might be affected by your race, income, job status and education, a new study says.

"If you're going home to a wealthy neighborhood with highly educated parents or spouse, then you're arguably in a much better ...

27 Apr
High Medical Bills Tied to Worse Outcomes for Younger Cancer Survivors

High Medical Bills Tied to Worse Outcomes for Younger Cancer Survivors

U.S. cancer survivors under age 65 with medical-related financial struggles have an increased risk of early death, a new study finds.

"Our findings show the need to address

15 Feb
Poor Will Be Hit Hardest by a Hotter World

Poor Will Be Hit Hardest by a Hotter World

In yet another sign that climate change strikes the poorest without mercy, a new study shows that low-income people have a 40% higher exposure to heat than those with higher incomes.

By the end of the century, heat...

01 Feb
Blood Pressure Crises Sending More Americans to the ER

Blood Pressure Crises Sending More Americans to the ER

Hospitalizations for dangerously high blood pressure more than doubled in the United States from 2002 to 2014, new research shows.

This jump in hospitalizations for what's called a "

26 Jan
Omicron Batters Already Strained U.S. Hospitals

Omicron Batters Already Strained U.S. Hospitals

U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the v...

19 Jan
Conservatorships Keep the Homeless in Psychiatric Wards Too Long: Study

Conservatorships Keep the Homeless in Psychiatric Wards Too Long: Study

Homelessness is difficult enough, but when it's compounded by serious mental health issues the result can be an inability to function at even the most basic level.

Sometimes that leads to round-the-clock involuntary hospitalization, and when that happens a state-appointe...

12 Jan
Medicaid Rules May Affect Americans' Cancer Survival

Medicaid Rules May Affect Americans' Cancer Survival

The chance of someone who is covered by Medicaid surviving cancer may depend in part on where they live, a new analysis finds.

In states that had lower Medicaid income eligibility limits, cancer survival rates were...

04 Jan
Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having Insurance

Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having Insurance

Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their soci...

31 Dec
Severe Illness in Children Brings Hardship for Families

Severe Illness in Children Brings Hardship for Families

When a sick child spends time in the intensive care unit, the impact lasts even after the hospital stay is over.

Added to it are days, weeks, sometimes months out of school for the young patient and extended work absences for their primary caregivers.

"Pediatric c...

30 Dec
Family Factors Affect Child's Odds for Cleft Palate

Family Factors Affect Child's Odds for Cleft Palate

Economic status appears linked to increased risk of being born with a cleft palate or lip, new research suggests, building on past evidence that it can also result in delayed care and poorer outcomes.

Cleft palate and cleft lip are the terms that describe

27 Dec
Heat Waves Bring Health Crises to the Homeless

Heat Waves Bring Health Crises to the Homeless

Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

"The same weather that m...

22 Dec
Who's Dying Young in U.S. From Heart Attacks?

Who's Dying Young in U.S. From Heart Attacks?

Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 -- deaths that a...

22 Dec
Program Aims to Get Lifesaving Drugs to Kids With Cancer in Poorer Countries

Program Aims to Get Lifesaving Drugs to Kids With Cancer in Poorer Countries

A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launc...

20 Dec
Mom & Dad's Holiday Stress a Downer for Kids, Poll Finds

Mom & Dad's Holiday Stress a Downer for Kids, Poll Finds

Many parents want to make the holiday season magical for their kids, but for some the stress they feel trying to live up to that ideal may actually be doing the opposite.

A poll from Michigan ...

16 Dec
Global Rate of Stroke Cases, Deaths Still Too High

Global Rate of Stroke Cases, Deaths Still Too High

While strokes and related deaths have declined in rich nations, they remain stubbornly high worldwide, a new study says.

Author Liyuan Han attributed the overall decreases to "better medical services in high-income countries, which may offer earlier detection of stroke r...

15 Dec
Many Seniors on Medicare Falling Into Medical Debt

Many Seniors on Medicare Falling Into Medical Debt

"Medicare For All" gets tossed around a lot by advocates of universal health coverage, but a new study finds that today's Medicare is far from free for seniors and people with disabilities.

Instead, a large number of beneficiaries are sliding into medical debt and delayi...

15 Dec
Converting Hotels to Rooms for Homeless People Curbed COVID's Spread

Converting Hotels to Rooms for Homeless People Curbed COVID's Spread

Here's a social distancing strategy that really worked in the early days of the pandemic: New research shows that providing hotel rooms to homeless people at high risk for severe COVID-19 significantly lowered their chance of infection.

In early April 2020, the city of C...

15 Dec
Across the U.S., Black Americans Breathe in Dirtier Air

Across the U.S., Black Americans Breathe in Dirtier Air

Is air pollution a bigger health threat to minorities?

Apparently so, claims a new U.S. study that finds while air pollution levels have fallen in recent decades, people of color still have more exposure to dirty air than white Americans do.

14 Dec
For Many, Holiday Joy Is Shadowed by COVID Fears: Poll

For Many, Holiday Joy Is Shadowed by COVID Fears: Poll

Stress about the COVID-19 pandemic may be eclipsing holiday joy for many older Americans, a new poll reveals.

About half (47%) of 50- to 80-year-olds polled reported a mixed experience of joy and

14 Dec
Pandemic-Linked Rise in Crime Hit America's Poor Neighborhoods Hardest

Pandemic-Linked Rise in Crime Hit America's Poor Neighborhoods Hardest

Poor neighborhoods of color bore the brunt of a surge in violent crime in U.S. cities early in the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

"This study adds to the mounting body of...

13 Dec
Many Home Health Care Workers in Poor Health Themselves

Many Home Health Care Workers in Poor Health Themselves

They take care of others, but many U.S. home health care workers say they're not in good shape themselves, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed self-reported data collected from nearly 3,000 home health care workers in 38 states between 2014 and 2018 and found that mo...

07 Dec
Biden Pledges to Lower Prescription Drug Prices for Americans

Biden Pledges to Lower Prescription Drug Prices for Americans

President Joe Biden promised cheaper prescription drugs for all Americans on Monday as his social agenda legislation winds its way through Congress.

Biden tried to shift Americans' focus to pocketbook provisions overlooked in his $2 trillion legislation, which deals with...

03 Dec
Most Vaccinated Adults Plan to Get Boosters: Poll

Most Vaccinated Adults Plan to Get Boosters: Poll

Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of v...

02 Dec
A Little Cash May Help Women Quit Smoking During Pregnancy: Study

A Little Cash May Help Women Quit Smoking During Pregnancy: Study

Quitting smoking is especially important during pregnancy, and now a new study suggests that when it comes to kicking the habit, cash may be just the incentive some women need.

The study results suggest progressive financial rewards for smoking abstinence "could be imple...

01 Dec
WHO Approves First Long-Acting Device to Shield Women From HIV

WHO Approves First Long-Acting Device to Shield Women From HIV

With HIV a continuing threat to women's health, the World Health Organization (WHO) has approved the first long-acting device to protect women from sexually transmitted HIV.

The device is a vaginal ring made of silicone elastomer, a flexible rubber-like material that mak...

30 Nov
Postpartum Depression Can Do Long-Term Harm to Women's Finances

Postpartum Depression Can Do Long-Term Harm to Women's Finances

Besides its terrible impact on mental health, postpartum depression can also bring long-term financial struggles to affected women, new research shows.

"These findings highlight the importance of screening and expanding access to mental health support services for low-in...

26 Nov
Could a Single Dose of the HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

Could a Single Dose of the HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high le...

18 Nov
Neurologists' Group Issues Guidance to Families on Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

Neurologists' Group Issues Guidance to Families on Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

Neurologists must make sure Alzheimer's patients and their families understand that the controversial drug aducanumab does not restore mental function, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) said in new position statement that includes ethical guidelines.

"Aducanumab is...

18 Nov
Across America, Black People Have Worse Health Outcomes

Across America, Black People Have Worse Health Outcomes

Race-based gaps in health care and health outcomes persist in every region of the United States, a new state-by-state report card shows.

Racial and ethnic disparities woven throughout America and its system of health care mean that people of color are more likely to die ...

16 Nov
Pfizer COVID Pill to Be Made, Sold Cheaply in 95 Poor Countries

Pfizer COVID Pill to Be Made, Sold Cheaply in 95 Poor Countries

Pfizer Inc. announced Tuesday that it has reached an agreement for its promising COVID-19 antiviral pill to be made and sold cheaply in 95 developing nations.

The countries included in the licensing deal are mostly in Africa and Asia, and they account for more than half ...

15 Nov
Pricey Alzheimer's Drug Drives Spike in Medicare B Premium: Officials

Pricey Alzheimer's Drug Drives Spike in Medicare B Premium: Officials

A new and expensive Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm is responsible for about half of the $21.60 increase in monthly premiums for Medicare's Part B outpatient program in 2022, Medicare officials report.

The new premium will be $170.10 a month, and the $21.60 boost is the ...

11 Nov
Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

"During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagu...

04 Nov
Nearly 3 in 10 U.S. Adults Say They Have a Disability

Nearly 3 in 10 U.S. Adults Say They Have a Disability

A growing number of American adults say they have a physical or mental disability, a new study finds.

Of more than 400,000 adults who responded to a 2019 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey, 27% reported a disability. That's a 1% increase since 2016, ...

03 Nov
Medicare Could Negotiate Drug Prices Under Democrat Proposal

Medicare Could Negotiate Drug Prices Under Democrat Proposal

A measure designed to lower prescription drug costs for seniors has been added to President Joe Biden's social safety net and climate change bill that Democratic leaders hope to bring to a House vote this week.

For the first time, the measure would enable the federal gov...

02 Nov
When Climbing Corporate Ladder, Women Are as Competitive as Men: Study

When Climbing Corporate Ladder, Women Are as Competitive as Men: Study

Women are as competitive and as willing to take risks as men when it comes to advancing in the workplace, according to a new study on the gender pay gap in the United States.

"If we're finally going to close the gender pay gap, then we have to understand the sources of i...

02 Nov
Biden Administration Moves to Cut Methane Emissions That Threaten Climate, Health

Biden Administration Moves to Cut Methane Emissions That Threaten Climate, Health

A new rule to sharply cut methane emissions and other oil and gas industry air pollutants that harm health and contribute to climate change is in the works.

The new Clean Air Act rule proposed Tuesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would cut 41 million...

01 Nov
Financial Stress Burdens More Than Half of New U.S. Moms: Study

Financial Stress Burdens More Than Half of New U.S. Moms: Study

The joys of motherhood may be overshadowed in the United States since as many as 50% of new or expectant moms can't pay their bills, including health care bills, new research suggests.

"Financial hardship is highly prevalent among pregnant and postpartum women," said stu...

29 Oct
More Fast-Food Outlets, More Diabetes in Your Neighborhood

More Fast-Food Outlets, More Diabetes in Your Neighborhood

Living near a fast-food restaurant may provide a quick fix if you're famished and pressed for time, but it may boost your odds for type 2 diabetes, a large study of U.S veterans suggests.

Neighborhoods with more supermarkets, however, may protect you against developing d...