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Results for search "Health Care Access / Disparities".

Health News Results - 195

30 Jul
Deaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural America

Deaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural America

FRIDAY, July 30, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Death rates from Alzheimer's disease are particularly high in the rural United States, a preliminary study finds, highlighting a need for health care resources in traditionally under-served areas.

Researchers d...

29 Jul
Lowering Medicare Age Could Help Close Racial Gaps in Health Care: Study

Lowering Medicare Age Could Help Close Racial Gaps in Health Care: Study

Could reducing racial disparities in health care be as simple as lowering the age at which Americans qualify for Medicare?

Yes, claims a new study that suggests lowering eligibility from age 65 to age 60 could go a long way toward addressing inequities in health insuranc...

28 Jul
Many Black Men Missed Out on Prostate Cancer Care During Pandemic

Many Black Men Missed Out on Prostate Cancer Care During Pandemic

Black men in the United States have higher rates of prostate cancer than white men, yet they were far less likely to have surgery for their cancer during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from a Pennsylvania urologic d...

26 Jul
Patients of Color Less Likely to Get Specialist Care Than White Patients

Patients of Color Less Likely to Get Specialist Care Than White Patients

MONDAY, July 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- People of color are consistently less likely to see medical specialists than white patients are, a new U.S. study finds, highlighting yet another disparity in the nation's health care system.

Researchers found ...

22 Jul
Even at Same Hospital, Black Patients Face More Complications Than Whites

Even at Same Hospital, Black Patients Face More Complications Than Whites

THURSDAY, July 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans admitted for inpatient hospital care are far more likely than white patients to experience safety-related health complications -- even when both are treated in the same facility, a new report warns....

19 Jul
Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical Debt

Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical Debt

The coronavirus pandemic has left plenty of Americans saddled with medical bills they can't pay, a new survey reveals.

More than 50% of those who were infected with COVID-19 or who lost income due to the pandemic are now struggling with medical debt, according to resear...

19 Jul
Long Distance to Care Can Mean Worse Outcomes for Young Cancer Patients

Long Distance to Care Can Mean Worse Outcomes for Young Cancer Patients

Teens and young adults with cancer who live in rural areas or far from the hospital where they were diagnosed are more likely to have advanced cancer and more likely to die, new research shows.

"A number of studies have indicated that place of residence can influence can...

16 Jul
Why Many Black & Hispanic Americans Distrust COVID Vaccines

Why Many Black & Hispanic Americans Distrust COVID Vaccines

Language barriers and distrust of the health care system are among the reasons why many Black and Hispanic Americans are reluctant to get COVID-19 vaccines, a new study finds.

The two groups -- which have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic -- have followed...

15 Jul
More Americans Gaining Access to Opioid Addiction Treatment, But Race Matters

More Americans Gaining Access to Opioid Addiction Treatment, But Race Matters

Opioid addiction treatment has become more widely available to Medicaid recipients under the Affordable Care Act, but Black patients are much less likely than white patients to get that treatment, a new study finds.

"Opioid use disorder can be treated, just like any othe...

09 Jul
Even Before Pandemic, One-Third of U.S. Adults Went Without Dental Care

Even Before Pandemic, One-Third of U.S. Adults Went Without Dental Care

Millions of American adults haven't seen a dentist in at least a year, a new U.S. government health survey reveals.

In 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic made dental visits difficult, a third of adults under 65 hadn't had a dental exam or cleaning in the past 12 month...

08 Jul
Depression Plagues Many Coal Miners With Black Lung Disease

Depression Plagues Many Coal Miners With Black Lung Disease

Mental health problems and thoughts of suicide are common among U.S. coal miners with black lung disease, a new study finds.

Black lung is a progressive illness caused by inhaling toxic coal and rock dust in coal mines. There are few treatment options.

"Although c...

07 Jul
Language Barriers Keep 25 million in U.S. From Good Health Care

Language Barriers Keep 25 million in U.S. From Good Health Care

Due to language barriers, 25 million Spanish speakers receive about a third less health care than other Americans, a large study of U.S. adults shows.

The analysis of federal survey data from more than 120,000 adults revealed that total use of health care (as measured by...

06 Jul
People With HIV Have Much Higher Risk for Suicide

People With HIV Have Much Higher Risk for Suicide

TUESDAY, July 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Since the advent of AIDS, major advancements in treating HIV infection has turned what used to be a death sentence into a manageable chronic condition.

But new research warns that many people living with HIV/AI...

06 Jul
Why Do Black Patients Fare Worse When MS Strikes?

Why Do Black Patients Fare Worse When MS Strikes?

TUESDAY, July 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- While multiple sclerosis can cause a wide swath of symptoms and challenges for anyone diagnosed with the autoimmune disease, a new study finds that race may play a role in disease severity.

Researchers discover...

02 Jul
Gap in Breast Cancer Survival for Black, White Patients Shrinks, But Not by Enough

Gap in Breast Cancer Survival for Black, White Patients Shrinks, But Not by Enough

FRIDAY, July 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Racial disparities in breast cancer survival have narrowed in recent years, but Black women with the disease still have double the death rate of white women.

That's according to a study that tracked breast cance...

02 Jul
Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

Many women in the United States aren't screened for cervical cancer because they can't afford it, a new study finds.

Screening helps reduce cervical cancer cases and deaths, but disparities in screening rates exist based on income, insurance status, race and ethnicity.

01 Jul
Gene-Based Embryo Selection: Are 'Designer Babies' on the Horizon?

Gene-Based Embryo Selection: Are 'Designer Babies' on the Horizon?

The notion of parents picking out genetically perfect babies may seem like science fiction, but bioethicists warn in a new report that some companies have already started to offer couples going through in vitro fertilization (IVF) the means to pick better embryos through polyg...

30 Jun
Women's Cancer Screenings Plummeted During Pandemic

Women's Cancer Screenings Plummeted During Pandemic

Breast and cervical cancer screenings dropped sharply among low-income minority women during the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

That could lead to delayed cancer diagnoses, health consequences and an increase in existing disp...

29 Jun
Poorly Managed Diabetes Raises Odds for More Severe COVID

Poorly Managed Diabetes Raises Odds for More Severe COVID

Hospitalized patients with diabetes who hadn't been taking their medication had more severe cases of COVID-19, a new study shows.

"Our results highlight the importance of assessing, monitoring and controlling blood glucose [sugar] in hospitalized COVID-19 patients from ...

25 Jun
Liver Cirrhosis Much More Deadly for Black Americans

Liver Cirrhosis Much More Deadly for Black Americans

Black Americans with cirrhosis -- late-stage liver disease -- are much less likely to receive a liver transplant and more likely to die than white patients, new research reveals.

For the study, researchers at Northwestern Medicine analyzed data from all cirrhosis patien...

24 Jun
Drop in Life Expectancy From COVID Much Worse for Black, Hispanic Americans

Drop in Life Expectancy From COVID Much Worse for Black, Hispanic Americans

The COVID-19 pandemic dealt a significant blow to life expectancy in the United States, researchers say.

Overall, American life expectancy dropped by just over one year in 2020. But researchers found the pandemic hit minority groups even harder, shaving more than three y...

18 Jun
Many 'High Priority' Patients Aren't Getting Put on Kidney Transplant Lists

Many 'High Priority' Patients Aren't Getting Put on Kidney Transplant Lists

Many Americans who stand to benefit most from a kidney transplant may be missing a key window of opportunity, a new study finds.

The study focused on kidney failure patients who would be expected to live many years after receiving a kidney transplant. That generally incl...

18 Jun
Hospitals: One Reason COVID Is More Lethal for Black Americans

Hospitals: One Reason COVID Is More Lethal for Black Americans

Black COVID-19 patients in the United States are more likely to die than white patients, but there would be 10% fewer deaths among Black patients if they could get the same level of hospital care as white people, according to new research.

"Our study reveals that Black ...

17 Jun
$10,000: What New Parents Might Pay for Childbirth, Even With Insurance

$10,000: What New Parents Might Pay for Childbirth, Even With Insurance

Having a baby is expensive. The cost of diapers, a crib, a car seat and all the other infant necessities can really add up, and now a new study shows that having a child comes with its own hefty hospital price tag for many U.S. families.

About one in six families in the ...

15 Jun
Race Doesn't Affect Risk for Genes That Raise Breast Cancer Risk

Race Doesn't Affect Risk for Genes That Raise Breast Cancer Risk

Rates of breast cancer-related genetic mutations in Black and white women are the same, according to a new study that contradicts previous research.

It found that about 5% of both groups of women have a genetic mutation that increases the risk of breast cancer.

<...

14 Jun
Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the...

10 Jun
A Real Headache: Racism Plays Role in Migraine Care

A Real Headache: Racism Plays Role in Migraine Care

The color of your skin may very well determine how your headache gets treated, a new study warns.

The same percentage of white, Black and Hispanic Americans - about 15% - suffer from severe headaches and/or migraines, the investigators noted.

But the current analys...

09 Jun
Medicare's Penalties for Poor-Quality Dialysis Centers Aren't Helping: Study

Medicare's Penalties for Poor-Quality Dialysis Centers Aren't Helping: Study

Dialysis centers hit with financial penalties for poor performance don't tend to improve afterward, calling into question a set of U.S. federal programs intended to improve health care nationwide, a new report says.

Dialysis centers face up to a 2% reduction in their ann...

09 Jun
Why a COVID Diagnosis Could Cost You Way More Money in 2021

Why a COVID Diagnosis Could Cost You Way More Money in 2021

COVID-19 could be a much more expensive experience for folks who fall ill this year, thanks to the return of deductibles and copays, new research suggests.

Most folks who became gravely ill with COVID last year didn't face crushing medical bills because nearly all insura...

08 Jun
Death Rates Are Rising Across Rural America

Death Rates Are Rising Across Rural America

In rural America, more people die from chronic health conditions and substance abuse than in suburbs and cities, and the gap is widening.

Researchers report in a new study that the difference in rural and urban death rates tripled over the past 20 years mostly due to dea...

08 Jun
Think You Can Skip That Annual Physical?  Think Again

Think You Can Skip That Annual Physical?  Think Again

Despite calls from some leading health experts to scrap annual physicals because they are a waste of time and money, a new study finds advantages to routine screenings.

"While it is disappointing that I can't tell my patients a visit with me or my colleagues will help th...

07 Jun
People of Color Have Twice the Risk of Dying After Brain Injury, Study Finds

People of Color Have Twice the Risk of Dying After Brain Injury, Study Finds

The risk of death after a traumatic brain injury is twice as high among people of color as it is among whites, a new study finds.

Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) researchers reviewed outcomes among more than 6,300 traumatic brain injury patients treated at the ...

04 Jun
Breast Cancer's Spread Is More Likely in Black Women, Study Finds

Breast Cancer's Spread Is More Likely in Black Women, Study Finds

After a diagnosis of breast cancer, Black women face a greater risk of having the disease spread to distant sites in the body - a disparity that is not readily explained, researchers say.

It's known that in the United States, Black women have the highest death rates from...

03 Jun
After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the medical society and its network of 12 influential journals.

Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor-in-chie...

02 Jun
Are Adults With Cerebral Palsy Getting the Therapies They Need?

Are Adults With Cerebral Palsy Getting the Therapies They Need?

U.S. adults with cerebral palsy aren't getting adequate physical therapy, according to a new study.

While they're more likely than other adults in community-living situations to have debilitating pain from musculoskeletal disorders, those with cerebral palsy receive sign...

31 May
Telehealth Is Growing in Use, Acceptance Among Americans: Poll

Telehealth Is Growing in Use, Acceptance Among Americans: Poll

Many Americans have used telehealth and would turn to it for mental health care, a new online poll shows.

Conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) from March 26 to April 5, the poll found that 38% had used telehealth to consult with a health professional...

28 May
Out-of-Pocket Costs Delay Cancer Follow-Up Care, Even for the Insured

Out-of-Pocket Costs Delay Cancer Follow-Up Care, Even for the Insured

About 1 in 10 U.S. cancer survivors delays follow-up care because they can't afford associated medical bills, even if they're insured.

That's the conclusion from an analysis of data from more than 5,400 survivors of various cancers. Most were insured, college-educated an...

24 May
Mammography Rates Plummeted During Pandemic

Mammography Rates Plummeted During Pandemic

There was a sharp drop in mammography breast cancer screening during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the decline was especially severe among American women of color and those living in rural areas, new research shows.

Those trends could cost lives in years to come, because "d...

19 May
Two-Fifths of Americans With COPD Live Far From Lung Rehab

Two-Fifths of Americans With COPD Live Far From Lung Rehab

Pulmonary rehab can improve the quality of life for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but as many as 40% of U.S. seniors with COPD lack access to these programs, largely because there are none nearby.

COPD is an umbrella term for chronic lung dise...

13 May
Many Americans Live Too Far From Opioid Addiction Treatment

Many Americans Live Too Far From Opioid Addiction Treatment

In areas of the United States where opioid treatment centers are rare, addicted people can find it nearly impossible to get help, a new study finds.

"The study identified clear opioid treatment deserts that undoubtedly stand in the way of access to needed care and that ...

12 May
For the Poor, Even a Small Medical Bill Can Trigger Coverage Loss

For the Poor, Even a Small Medical Bill Can Trigger Coverage Loss

WEDNESDAY, May 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) - When people with low incomes are asked to help pay for their health insurance, some drop their coverage, even when bills as low as $20 per month arrive.

That's the upshot of a new study of Medicaid expansion in the state of Mich...

07 May
Fear of Losing Health Insurance Keeps 1 in 6 U.S. Workers in Their Jobs

Fear of Losing Health Insurance Keeps 1 in 6 U.S. Workers in Their Jobs

Many American workers remain in jobs they'd rather leave -- simply because they don't want to lose their health insurance, a new Gallup poll reveals.

That's the situation for 16% of respondents in a nationwide poll of more than 3,800 adults conducted March 15-21.

T...

04 May
1 in 3 Neighborhoods in Major U.S. Cities Is a 'Pharmacy Desert'

1 in 3 Neighborhoods in Major U.S. Cities Is a 'Pharmacy Desert'

One-third of neighborhoods in the 30 largest U.S. cities are "pharmacy deserts," and this is much more common in Black and Hispanic communities, a new study finds.

What's a 'pharmacy desert'? In general, in a neighborhood where most residents have cars, the study labele...

03 May
Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Health care in rural America has become ever more scarce during the coronavirus pandemic, with folks finding it increasingly difficult to find a doctor or get to a hospital.

For a decade, rural areas have been losing hospitals to financial problems, forcing residents to ...

03 May
Why U.S. Hispanics Got COVID at Higher Rates: Their Jobs

Why U.S. Hispanics Got COVID at Higher Rates: Their Jobs

Workplace exposure to the new coronavirus is a major reason for Hispanic Americans' disproportionately high COVID-19 death rate, a new study claims.

In 2020, Hispanics accounted for 19% of the U.S. population but nearly 41% of COVID-19 deaths, data from the U.S. Centers ...

03 May
Obamacare Gave More Breast Cancer Survivors Access to Breast Reconstruction

Obamacare Gave More Breast Cancer Survivors Access to Breast Reconstruction

Breast reconstruction rates rose significantly among Black women after Obamacare expanded access to Medicaid, a new study says.

It also found a large increase in reconstruction rates among women with lower income and education levels.

The findings suggest "that Med...

29 Apr
Good Stroke Recovery May Depend on Your ZIP Code: Study

Good Stroke Recovery May Depend on Your ZIP Code: Study

Stroke recovery tends to be worse among Americans in poorer neighborhoods than those in wealthier neighborhoods, a new study finds.

"People in less advantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have more disability, lower quality of life and more symptoms of depression th...

28 Apr
When Cancer Strikes Those Under 40, Race Matters

When Cancer Strikes Those Under 40, Race Matters

Young Black and Hispanic cancer patients face poorer survival odds than their white counterparts, even from some cancers that are highly curable, a new study finds.

It's well known that the United States has long-standing racial disparities in cancer survival.

The...

26 Apr
Low Risk of Mom Passing COVID to Newborn

Low Risk of Mom Passing COVID to Newborn

The risk of mother-to-newborn transmission of COVID-19 is low, but the illness in pregnant women can trigger preterm birth, researchers say.

The new study looked at 255 babies born in Massachusetts last year to mothers with a recent positive test for COVID-19.

Only...

22 Apr
How 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your Race

How 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your Race

Black and Hispanic survivors of a bleeding stroke are more likely than white survivors to have changes in small blood vessels in the brain that increase the risk of another bleeding stroke, researchers say.

'Bleeding' strokes, also called hemorrhagic stroke, comprise abo...