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Health News Results - 230

30 Jul
Could COVID-19 Accelerate Alzheimer's Symptoms?

Could COVID-19 Accelerate Alzheimer's Symptoms?

COVID-19 can kill you. It can rob you of your breath, cause strange blood clots, and prompt side effects that last for months after you're over the initial infection.

It's also possible that COVID-19 might impact the human brain in ways that could promote the onset of Al...

30 Jul
Premature Delivery Raises Odds for Cerebral Palsy

Premature Delivery Raises Odds for Cerebral Palsy

Extremely premature babies have a much higher risk of cerebral palsy and other neurological conditions than full-term infants, a large Israeli study affirms.

Cerebral palsy -- the name for a group of lifelong conditions that affect movement and coordination -- is the mos...

25 Jul
It's Tick Season: Protect Yourself From Lyme Disease

It's Tick Season: Protect Yourself From Lyme Disease

When you're heading outdoors this summer, keep an eye out for ticks during and after your outing, health experts say.

These common parasites can transmit Lyme disease, a potentially serious illness.

Lyme disease is transmitted to people through the bite of an infe...

23 Jul
Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

FRIDAY, July 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already app...

20 Jul
Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, h...

20 Jul
Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?

Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?

Women on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause go on to have a 58% lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, a new study finds.

Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause and effect, the findings could point the way to new...

19 Jul
Shock Therapy Safe, Effective for Tough-to-Treat Depression

Shock Therapy Safe, Effective for Tough-to-Treat Depression

MONDAY, July 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- "Shock" therapy often helps lift severe depression, but fear and stigma can deter patients from getting it. Now a large new study is confirming the treatment's safety.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as it's m...

19 Jul
Geneticists Probe Origins of Painful Cluster Headaches

Geneticists Probe Origins of Painful Cluster Headaches

The causes of a type of excruciating headache known as cluster headaches aren't clear, but heredity is known to play a role. Now, genetic factors associated with cluster headaches are under investigation as scientists search for more effective treatments.

15 Jul
Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

THURSDAY, July 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BC...

13 Jul
Growing Up in Lead-Contaminated Area Might Alter Personality: Study

Growing Up in Lead-Contaminated Area Might Alter Personality: Study

TUESDAY, July 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Can childhood lead exposure affect personality into adulthood?

Yes, a big multi-decade study suggests.

The finding stems from an analysis of data on atmospheric lead levels across the United States and 3...

08 Jul
Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality — and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological ba...

02 Jul
Could Losing Your Wisdom Teeth Enhance Your Sense of Taste?

Could Losing Your Wisdom Teeth Enhance Your Sense of Taste?

Having your wisdom teeth yanked could have one culinary up side: Heightening your sense of taste.

So claims a new study that challenges previous research on the issue.

"Prior studies have only pointed to adverse effects on taste after extraction, and it has been ge...

01 Jul
New Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the Brain

New Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the Brain

Behaviors associated with eating disorders can make real changes to the brain, new research shows. The findings could help explain why these serious disorders are often chronic -- and may also point the way to new treatments.

Eating disorders — such as anorexia nervos...

25 Jun
First Signs of MS May Often Go Undiagnosed

First Signs of MS May Often Go Undiagnosed

Early symptoms of multiple sclerosis may commonly be missed for years before the right diagnosis is made, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that patients with MS had a higher-than-average number of medical appointments, with doctors of various specialties, for up t...

24 Jun
Lost Sense of Smell Returns for Almost All COVID Survivors

Lost Sense of Smell Returns for Almost All COVID Survivors

A year on, nearly all patients in a French study who lost their sense of smell after a bout of COVID-19 did regain that ability, researchers report.

"Persistent COVID-19-related anosmia [loss of smell] has an excellent prognosis, with nearly complete recovery at one year...

17 Jun
Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Aiming to deliver a one-two punch to the herpes virus, animal research on an experimental drug found it tackled active infections and reduced or eliminated the risk of future outbreaks.

Existing treatments, such as Zovirax, Valtrex or Famvir, are o...

16 Jun
What Works Best to Ease Migraines?

What Works Best to Ease Migraines?

A new research review offers good news for migraine sufferers: There are more pain-relieving options than ever.

In an analysis of over 100 published studies, researchers found that several drug classes showed good evidence they ease the pain of a migraine-in-progress.

11 Jun
Poor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia Risk

Poor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia Risk

Sleep disorders may increase the odds for dementia in survivors of traumatic brain injury, new research suggests.

The study included nearly 713,000 patients who were free of dementia when they were treated for traumatic brain injury (TBI) between 2003 and 2013. The sever...

10 Jun
A Real Headache: Racism Plays Role in Migraine Care

A Real Headache: Racism Plays Role in Migraine Care

The color of your skin may very well determine how your headache gets treated, a new study warns.

The same percentage of white, Black and Hispanic Americans - about 15% - suffer from severe headaches and/or migraines, the investigators noted.

But the current analys...

07 Jun
New Disabilities Plague Half of COVID Survivors After Hospital Discharge

New Disabilities Plague Half of COVID Survivors After Hospital Discharge

People hospitalized for COVID-19 are often discharged in much worse shape than before their illness - underscoring the value of preventing severe cases with vaccination.

In a new study, researchers found that during the pandemic's early months, almost half of COVID-19 pa...

03 Jun
Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy May Help Parkinson's Patients Long Term

Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy May Help Parkinson's Patients Long Term

Parkinson's disease patients can get symptom relief with deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy that lasts over the long term, a new study shows.

Over 15 years, patients who received DBS, which requires surgical implantation, had significant improvement in motor symptoms a...

12 May
Do Prescription Sleep Medicines Even Work?

Do Prescription Sleep Medicines Even Work?

An estimated 9 million Americans turn to prescription pills when they can't sleep, but a new study of middle-aged women finds taking the drugs for a year or longer may do little good.

Comparing a group of about 200 women who were medicated for sleep problems with over 40...

11 May
New Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries

New Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries

It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests.

The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the he...

11 May
Most Severe COVID Cases Involve Neuro Issues, and They're More Often Fatal

Most Severe COVID Cases Involve Neuro Issues, and They're More Often Fatal

Neurological problems are occurring in a very high percentage of hospitalized COVID-19 patients -- and what's worse, those symptoms foretell a bad end for many sufferers, a new study finds.

About four out of five people sick enough to be hospitalized for COVID-19 suffer...

10 May
Why Sleep Raises Risk for Sudden Death in People With Epilepsy

Why Sleep Raises Risk for Sudden Death in People With Epilepsy

New research gives insight into why people with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden death during sleep.

The study found that both sleep and epileptic seizures work together to slow heart rate, and that seizures also disrupt the body's natural regulation of sleep-rel...

28 Apr
Race Against Time: Stricken With ALS, She's Seeking Access to Experimental Drug

Race Against Time: Stricken With ALS, She's Seeking Access to Experimental Drug

Like many proud moms, Lisa Stockman-Mauriello of Summit, N.J., is looking forward to exciting milestones in lives of her three sons over the coming months: One will graduate college, one will enter college, and the third will begin high school.

But unlike other moms, it...

22 Apr
Long-Haul COVID Symptoms Common, Rise With Severity of Illness

Long-Haul COVID Symptoms Common, Rise With Severity of Illness

For people who've suffered through a bout of COVID-19, their misery is too often not over. New research shows that a wide variety of "long-haul" symptoms are common, and the risk rises along with the severity of their case of COVID-19.

In what may be the largest such st...

22 Apr
'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health

'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health

Waking up briefly throughout the night may do more than leave you feeling grumpy and tired in the morning.

Disrupted sleep may actually increase your odds of dying early from heart disease or any other cause, and women seem to be harder hit by these effects than men.

...

22 Apr
How 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your Race

How 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your Race

Black and Hispanic survivors of a bleeding stroke are more likely than white survivors to have changes in small blood vessels in the brain that increase the risk of another bleeding stroke, researchers say.

'Bleeding' strokes, also called hemorrhagic stroke, comprise abo...

22 Apr
Brain Study Suggests Autism Develops Differently in Girls Than Boys

Brain Study Suggests Autism Develops Differently in Girls Than Boys

Autism appears to develop differently in girls and boys, so the findings of research conducted mainly with boys might not apply to girls, a new study suggests.

Autism spectrum disorder is four times more common in boys, which may help explain why there's far less researc...

21 Apr
Could Chronic Sinusitis Affect Brain Health?

Could Chronic Sinusitis Affect Brain Health?

As if the headaches and stuffy nose aren't bad enough, chronic sinus trouble often leaves patients foggy-headed and depressed. Now, new research suggests one possible reason why: Sinusitis may trigger changes in brain activity.

"Chronic sinusitis is incredibly common," ...

21 Apr
'Nerve Zap' Pain Treatment Could Cut Need for Opioids After Surgeries

'Nerve Zap' Pain Treatment Could Cut Need for Opioids After Surgeries

An emerging technology could zap your post-op pain away -- little or no opioids needed.

The technique is called percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation. It involves inserting a small wire next to a nerve and using a stimulator to deliver a mild electrical current to th...

20 Apr
Sleepwalking Tied to Higher Odds for Parkinson's in Men

Sleepwalking Tied to Higher Odds for Parkinson's in Men

Men with certain sleep problems, like sleep walking, may be at a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests.

Among nearly 26,000 men, researchers found those who sleepwalked or had rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) had a four times...

14 Apr
Many Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic Symptoms

Many Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic Symptoms

In very rare cases, children infected with the new coronavirus can develop a severe illness known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Now, research finds that these young patients often develop neurologic symptoms along with the respiratory issues they might face.

07 Apr
Diminished Hearing, Vision Together Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia

Diminished Hearing, Vision Together Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia

A combination of hearing and vision loss is tied to an increased risk of mental decline and dementia, but having just one of those impairments isn't connected with a higher risk, a new South Korean study finds.

It's not clear why a diminishing of both senses, but not ju...

07 Apr
1 in 3 COVID Survivors Struggle With Mental Health Issues Months Later

1 in 3 COVID Survivors Struggle With Mental Health Issues Months Later

Doctors are seeing such cases around the world: About a third of COVID-19 patients go on to develop "long-haul" neurological or psychiatric conditions months after being infected, new research shows.

The findings suggest a link between COVID-19 and a higher risk for late...

29 Mar
Loneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer's

Loneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer's

Middle-aged folks who feel persistently lonely appear to have a nearly doubled risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports.

If you take steps to counter your loneliness, however, you might actually reduce your dementia risk, the researchers fo...

26 Mar
'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

When people die some cells in their brains go on for hours, even getting more active and growing to gargantuan proportions, new research shows.

Awareness of this activity, spurred on by "zombie genes," could affect research into diseases that affect the brain.

For ...

16 Mar
Half of COVID Survivors Struggle With Depression: Study

Half of COVID Survivors Struggle With Depression: Study

To the lingering damage of COVID-19 infection, add this side effect: New research shows that more than half of those sickened by COVID-19 report depression.

Among more than 3,900 people who had COVID-19 surveyed between May 2020 and January 2021, 52% suffered symptoms of...

13 Mar
Could a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?

Could a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?

About 7 out of 10 Alzheimer's patients wound up free of the brain plaques that are a hallmark of the disease after treatment with a potentially breakthrough experimental drug, clinical trial results show.

The drug, donanemab, also significantly slowed the patients' brain...

12 Mar
Switch to Plant-Based Diet Can Cut Your Odds for Stroke

Switch to Plant-Based Diet Can Cut Your Odds for Stroke

A healthy, plant-based diet could reduce your risk of stroke by up to 10%, researchers say.

This type of diet includes greater amounts of foods like vegetables, whole grains and beans, and fewer less-healthy foods like refined grains or added sugars.

"Many studies ...

11 Mar
Clocks 'Spring Forward' on Sunday: Be Prepared

Clocks 'Spring Forward' on Sunday: Be Prepared

Many people dread the switch to daylight saving time. When you're losing an hour of sleep, it can be hard to actually feel like springing forward.

Dr. Rachel Ziegler, a sleep medicine physician from the Mayo Clinic Health System in Fairmont, Minn., offers some tips for e...

09 Mar
For Amputees, a New Kind of Surgery May Allow Better Control, Sensation

For Amputees, a New Kind of Surgery May Allow Better Control, Sensation

A new type of surgery offers amputees better control of muscles that remain after surgery, and of their prosthetic limbs, its inventors say.

The standard surgical approach to amputation has changed little since the American Civil War, according to developers of the new a...

08 Mar
No Sense of Smell After COVID? Therapies Can Help Bring It Back

No Sense of Smell After COVID? Therapies Can Help Bring It Back

So, you had COVID-19 a few months back and you still can't smell that first steaming cup of coffee in the morning. Is there anything you can do to hasten the return of that vital sense?

Experts say there is, including "physical therapy" for your nose.

"In most case...

03 Mar
'Rerouting' Brain Blood Flow: Old Technique Could Be New Advance Against Strokes

'Rerouting' Brain Blood Flow: Old Technique Could Be New Advance Against Strokes

Doctors are testing a decades-old surgical technique as a new way to treat certain stroke patients. And the preliminary results look promising, they say.

At issue are strokes caused by intracranial atherosclerosis, where blood vessels within the brain become hardened and...

02 Mar
'Telestroke' Care at Hospitals Is Boosting Patient Outcomes

'Telestroke' Care at Hospitals Is Boosting Patient Outcomes

You've had a stroke and arrive at a hospital, but the stroke specialist is off-duty. Never fear: Telemedicine may help save your life.

Especially during the COVID-19 crisis, so-called 'telestroke' services -- where health workers use video to consult with a stroke specia...

01 Mar
Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

Spinal cord injuries can be devastating to the more than 17,000 Americans who suffer them each year. But many patients may have new reason for hope: Early research suggests infusions of stem cells could help them regain lost sensation and movement.

These improvements may...

24 Feb
'Night Owls' Perform Worse at Work, Study Finds

'Night Owls' Perform Worse at Work, Study Finds

"Early to bed, early to rise" may be good advice for your career. New research finds that, compared to night owls, folks with earlier bedtimes perform better at work and are less plagued by disabilities that lead to early retirement.

Overall, "night owls" were twice as l...

23 Feb
Grumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep Schedule

Grumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep Schedule

A steady sleep routine may do more than keep you well-rested: New research suggests that the more swings in your slumber schedule, the worse your mood and depression symptoms are likely to be.

Researchers from Michigan Medicine followed the sleep patterns of interns in t...

17 Feb
Too Little Sleep Could Raise Your Dementia Risk

Too Little Sleep Could Raise Your Dementia Risk

Older adults who get little sleep each night may be at heightened risk of dementia or earlier death, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among 2,600 older Americans, those who were deemed "short sleepers" -- catching no more than five hours of sleep at night -- ...