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Health News Results - 275

18 Jun
Sickle Cell Plagues Many Black Americans, But There's Hope for Better Treatments

Sickle Cell Plagues Many Black Americans, But There's Hope for Better Treatments

It's been more than six months since Brandy Compton last landed in a hospital emergency room.

That's an amazing medical achievement, brought about by scientific breakthroughs that have been unfortunately overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic, experts say.

Compt...

17 Jun
Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Aiming to deliver a one-two punch to the herpes virus, animal research on an experimental drug found it tackled active infections and reduced or eliminated the risk of future outbreaks.

Existing treatments, such as Zovirax, Valtrex or Famvir, are o...

14 Jun
Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the...

10 Jun
Gene Editing Technique Corrects Sickle Cell Disease in Mice

Gene Editing Technique Corrects Sickle Cell Disease in Mice

Researchers are using mice to study a potential new treatment that could help patients who have sickle cell disease, without some of the risks and side effects of existing therapies.

The investigators reported using genetic-based editing on mice to convert a disease-cau...

07 Jun
'Historic' Decision Expected on U.S. Approval of Alzheimer's Drug

'Historic' Decision Expected on U.S. Approval of Alzheimer's Drug

The first drug ever shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease could be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday, but experts say that approval will be surrounded by controversy.

In clinical trials, aducanumab showed a 22% reduction in the de...

03 Jun
After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the medical society and its network of 12 influential journals.

Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor-in-chie...

27 May
There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

The U.S. government and nonprofits are replacing drug companies as the main drivers of Alzheimer's disease research, two new studies show.

The findings are from an analysis of national data by Jeffrey Cummings, a research professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas ...

26 May
Shoulder Pain Can Plague Wheelchair Users, But Their Own Fat Cells Could Be Cure

Shoulder Pain Can Plague Wheelchair Users, But Their Own Fat Cells Could Be Cure

People with spinal cord injuries can overwork their shoulders as they move about in a wheelchair, and that often leads to chronic shoulder pain.

However, a small study suggests that an injection of the patient's own fat cells can help ease the pain.

The injected ce...

25 May
Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Highly Effective in Kids 12 and Older

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Highly Effective in Kids 12 and Older

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine fully protects children aged 12 to 17, the company announced Tuesday.

In a clinical trial that included more than 3,700 young volunteers, there were no cases of symptomatic COVID-19 infection in the two-thirds of participants who received bo...

24 May
Man Blind for 40 Years Regains Some Sight Through Gene Therapy

Man Blind for 40 Years Regains Some Sight Through Gene Therapy

Doctors for the first time have used a form of gene therapy to restore partial vision in a blind person, according to findings announced Monday.

The research team genetically altered retinal ganglion cells to become light-sensitive in a man whose vision was destroyed by ...

24 May
Science Studies Most Likely to Be Wrong Are the Most Widely Read

Science Studies Most Likely to Be Wrong Are the Most Widely Read

Studies that can't be verified and may be untrue are much more likely to be cited in the media because they tend to be more interesting, researchers report.

They looked at studies in top psychology, economic and nature/science journals and found that only 39% of...

20 May
Robotics Can Give People 3rd Thumb, But How Will Brain React?

Robotics Can Give People 3rd Thumb, But How Will Brain React?

If you've ever wished you had an extra hand to accomplish a task, never fear, scientists are working on that. But a new study raises questions about how such technology could affect your brain.

The findings come from ongoing research into a 3D-printed robotic thumb known...

13 May
New Drug Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Manage Asthma

New Drug Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Manage Asthma

An experimental injectable drug appears more versatile than existing medications in treating people with different forms of severe, hard-to-control asthma, clinical trial results show.

There are many different types of asthma brought on by many different triggers, and a ...

12 May
Could a Vaccine Against Future Pandemics Be on the Way?

Could a Vaccine Against Future Pandemics Be on the Way?

An ambitious new vaccine effort is taking aim at future coronavirus mutations that may threaten global health down the road.

So far, the "pan-coronavirus vaccine" has proven 100% effective in testing among monkeys, investigators reported.

"Large outbreaks of c...

12 May
'Mind-Reading' Technology Allows Paralyzed Man to Rapidly Text

'Mind-Reading' Technology Allows Paralyzed Man to Rapidly Text

A microchip implanted in the brain has allowed a paralyzed man to communicate by text -- at speeds that approach the typical smartphone user.

The achievement is the latest advance in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) systems.

Scientists have been studying BCI techn...

12 May
Humans Started Loving Carbs a Very Long Time Ago

Humans Started Loving Carbs a Very Long Time Ago

Not only have humans and their ancient ancestors been eating carbs for longer than was realized, but a new study finds these starchy foods may actually have played a part in the growth of the human brain.

A new study researching the history of the human oral microbiome ...

04 May
Not Just About Antibodies: Why mRNA COVID Vaccines May Shield From Variants

Not Just About Antibodies: Why mRNA COVID Vaccines May Shield From Variants

Two widely used COVID-19 vaccines -- Pfizer and Moderna -- will likely remain powerfully protective against developing serious illness even if coronavirus variants somehow manage to infect vaccinated patients, new research suggests.

Both vaccines are based on messenger R...

30 Apr
Researchers Seek Antiviral Pill That Would Ease COVID Severity

Researchers Seek Antiviral Pill That Would Ease COVID Severity

While COVID-19 research efforts must now shift toward the development of a pill that can prevent serious illness in the recently infected, experts say.

"We need a pill that can keep people out of the hospital, and the time to develop that is right now," Dr. Rajesh Gandhi...

30 Apr
Heat Waves Topping 132 Degrees F Likely in Middle East Without Action on Climate Change

Heat Waves Topping 132 Degrees F Likely in Middle East Without Action on Climate Change

The Middle East and North Africa are already among the hottest spots on the planet, but new research warns that if nothing is done to slow climate change there will be life-threatening heat waves with temperatures of 132 Fahrenheit or higher in those regions.

"Our resul...

28 Apr
Race Against Time: Stricken With ALS, She's Seeking Access to Experimental Drug

Race Against Time: Stricken With ALS, She's Seeking Access to Experimental Drug

Like many proud moms, Lisa Stockman-Mauriello of Summit, N.J., is looking forward to exciting milestones in lives of her three sons over the coming months: One will graduate college, one will enter college, and the third will begin high school.

But unlike other moms, it...

26 Apr
Is a Cheap 'Universal' Coronavirus Vaccine on the Way?

Is a Cheap 'Universal' Coronavirus Vaccine on the Way?

An experimental COVID-19 vaccine could potentially provide universal protection against future COVID variants as well as other coronaviruses -- maybe even the ones responsible for the common cold. And it's dirt cheap -- less than $1 a dose, researchers say.

The vaccine t...

19 Apr
Common MS Meds Might Be Less Effective in Black Patients

Common MS Meds Might Be Less Effective in Black Patients

Black people experience more severe courses of multiple sclerosis (MS), and now new research suggests that drugs commonly used to treat this disease may not work as well or for as long in these folks.

"I was amazed," said study researcher Dr. Gregg Silverman, a professor...

13 Apr
U.K. Variant Won't Trigger More Severe COVID, Studies Find

U.K. Variant Won't Trigger More Severe COVID, Studies Find

Two new studies out of Britain find that although the now-dominant "U.K. variant" of the new coronavirus does spread more quickly, it does not appear to lead to more severe disease in those made ill.

The findings should help allay fears that more patients will die after ...

09 Apr
Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

COVID-19 might have a tough new foe: The sun.

New research shows that sunnier regions of the United States have lower COVID-19 death rates than cloudier areas, suggesting that the sun's UV rays might somehow provide some protection against the disease.

The effect i...

09 Apr
Pandemic Has Put Many Clinical Trials on Hold

Pandemic Has Put Many Clinical Trials on Hold

Fewer clinical trials are being completed during the pandemic, which experts say could affect medical research for decades to come.

Previously, it was reported that more than 80% of clinical trials were suspended between March 1 and April 26, 2020, with the pandemic cite...

08 Apr
The Future of Cancer for Americans

The Future of Cancer for Americans

At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in th...

06 Apr
Moderna COVID Vaccine Offers Protection for at Least 6 Months: Study

Moderna COVID Vaccine Offers Protection for at Least 6 Months: Study

There's good news for the millions of Americans who've already received a dose or two of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine: New research shows the vaccine should protect against illness for at least six months.

The new study tracked 33 participants in the trials that led to the...

06 Apr
Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists thought twice about studying North American bats in their winter habitats. But they've now determined that the risk of humans passing the coronavirus to bats under these conditions was low.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

05 Apr
If You've Had COVID, One Vaccine Jab Will Do: Study

If You've Had COVID, One Vaccine Jab Will Do: Study

A new U.S. study offers more evidence that a single dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine may provide enough protection to people who've previously been infected with the coronavirus.

"Our findings extend those from smaller studies reported elsewhere and support a potenti...

01 Apr
Can Vaccinations Stop COVID Transmission? College Study Aims to Find Out

Can Vaccinations Stop COVID Transmission? College Study Aims to Find Out

It's the question everyone wants answered because reopening the world depends on it: Can coronavirus vaccines stop transmission of the virus?

Now, 21 universities across the United States are teaming up to find out.

The project, called Prevent COVID U, was started ...

26 Mar
'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

When people die some cells in their brains go on for hours, even getting more active and growing to gargantuan proportions, new research shows.

Awareness of this activity, spurred on by "zombie genes," could affect research into diseases that affect the brain.

For ...

22 Mar
A Noninvasive Alternative for Painful Arthritic Knees

A Noninvasive Alternative for Painful Arthritic Knees

For those who suffer painful arthritis in their aging knees, new research suggests a noninvasive treatment might deliver lasting relief.

Called genicular artery embolization, the roughly two-hour catheter treatment involves a once-and-done injection of tiny hydrogel part...

22 Mar
Coming Soon: Once-a-Week Insulin Injections?

Coming Soon: Once-a-Week Insulin Injections?

Daily insulin jabs can be the bane of existence for people who live with type 2 diabetes, but an investigational once-weekly insulin shot may be a game changer for these folks.

While the research is still in its early stages, the new drug called basal insulin Fc (BIF) is...

17 Mar
Disappointment and Hope From Two HIV Prevention Trials

Disappointment and Hope From Two HIV Prevention Trials

An antibody infusion being tested for preventing HIV does not seem to thwart most infections -- but its success against certain strains of the virus suggests researchers are on the right track.

That's the takeaway from a clinical trial that put the antibody, called VRC01...

17 Mar
Scientists Create First Lab Model of Human 'Pre-Embryo' for Research Purposes

Scientists Create First Lab Model of Human 'Pre-Embryo' for Research Purposes

Research into miscarriages, infertility and birth defects is now primed to undergo revolutionary advances, thanks to the creation in the lab of an early stage of human embryos by two separate international teams of scientists.

Both teams were able to use human cells...

15 Mar
Drink Up! Humans Are the 'Water-Saving Apes'

Drink Up! Humans Are the 'Water-Saving Apes'

Humans sweat more and move more than chimpanzees and other apes, but new research shows people are actually more water-efficient than their primate cousins.

For the first time, scientists say they measured precisely how much water humans lose and replace each day compare...

12 Mar
Why Cotton Masks Are Safer Masks

Why Cotton Masks Are Safer Masks

Cotton masks provide better protection against the new coronavirus than those made with synthetic fabrics, researchers say.

In a new study, investigators tested different mask fabrics under conditions that mimic the humidity of a person's breath in order to assess how th...

09 Mar
Science Reveals Why Tea Is Good for Your Heart

Science Reveals Why Tea Is Good for Your Heart

If a nice hot cup of tea sounds good to you, there's even more reason to enjoy one now. Scientists have gained new insight into how tea helps lower blood pressure, perhaps pointing the way to new types of blood pressure medications.

The researchers found that certain com...

08 Mar
Could a Drug Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Those at Risk?

Could a Drug Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Those at Risk?

Just two weeks of treatment with an experimental drug can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes by several years, researchers report.

The drug, called teplizumab, is already under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration based on earlier evidence of its effectiveness...

08 Mar
New First Look at the Tiniest Babies' Lungs

New First Look at the Tiniest Babies' Lungs

Researchers who recorded the most detailed images ever made of newborns' lungs as they took their first breaths say the breakthrough could improve treatment of breathing problems in babies.

"Respiratory problems are the most common reason we need to treat babies in inten...

05 Mar
A Vaccine Against UTIs? New Mouse Study Brings Shot Closer

A Vaccine Against UTIs? New Mouse Study Brings Shot Closer

Many women suffer through countless urinary tract infections (UTIs), but a new study in mice offers hope that a vaccine could one day bring their nightmares to an end.

"Although several vaccines against UTIs have been investigated in clinical trials, they have so far had...

03 Mar
New Coronavirus Variant Out of Brazil Now in 5 U.S. States

New Coronavirus Variant Out of Brazil Now in 5 U.S. States

The first U.S. case of a Brazilian COVID-19 variant that doctors fear can re-infect the previously sick surfaced in Minnesota in early January 2021, and the more infectious variant has since been found in four other states, a new government report says.

Known as the P.1 ...

03 Mar
Scientists Gain Insight Into Genetics of Glaucoma

Scientists Gain Insight Into Genetics of Glaucoma

Researchers have identified 44 new genetic variants associated with glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness. They say their findings could provide new targets to treat the common eye disease.

In their study, the international team compared the genes of more than 34,000 pe...

01 Mar
Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

Spinal cord injuries can be devastating to the more than 17,000 Americans who suffer them each year. But many patients may have new reason for hope: Early research suggests infusions of stem cells could help them regain lost sensation and movement.

These improvements may...

01 Mar
More Than 87,000 Scientific Papers Already Published on COVID-19

More Than 87,000 Scientific Papers Already Published on COVID-19

The world's researchers have worked at a breakneck pace during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through October, more than 87,000 papers about the new coronavirus were published worldwide. That's a remarkable number even given the significance of the pandemic, according to the res...

24 Feb
Coronavirus Antibodies Appear to Stop Reinfection for Months

Coronavirus Antibodies Appear to Stop Reinfection for Months

Protective immune system antibodies that develop after being infected with COVID-19 last for at least a few months, a new study suggests. And reinfection does seem to be relatively rare.

That could have big implications for public health and societies, including allowing...

23 Feb
You've Got Tens of Thousands of Virus Species Living in Your Gut

You've Got Tens of Thousands of Virus Species Living in Your Gut

Researchers have identified more than 140,000 viruses that live in the human gut, including half that were previously unknown.

The number and variety of viruses found in more than 28,000 gut microbiome samples gathered from different parts of the world are surprisingly h...

17 Feb
Autopsy Study May Explain Why Some COVID Survivors Have 'Brain Fog'

Autopsy Study May Explain Why Some COVID Survivors Have 'Brain Fog'

One of the least understood effects of COVID-19 infection is "brain fog," a kind of mental confusion that can take hold among seriously ill patients, sometimes lingering long after recovery.

Now, a new study has spotted a possible neurological clue in the form of highly ...

11 Feb
Prior Exposure to Common Cold Won't Shield You From COVID: Study

Prior Exposure to Common Cold Won't Shield You From COVID: Study

It would be nice if it were true, but a bout of the common cold won't protect you against the new coronavirus infection, researchers report.

Colds are caused by seasonal coronaviruses (CoVs) and previous studies have suggested that exposure to cold coronaviruses may saf...

10 Feb
Injected Drug Delivers Up to 20% Weight Loss in Trial

Injected Drug Delivers Up to 20% Weight Loss in Trial

A new weight-loss drug is almost twice as effective as current medications, clinical trial results show, and experts say it could revolutionize the treatment of obesity.

Overweight and obese people lost an average 15% of their body weight using a weekly injectable 2.4 mi...