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Health News Results - 91

03 Jun
'Gold Standard' Clinical Trial Finds Hydroxychloroquine Won't Prevent COVID-19

'Gold Standard' Clinical Trial Finds Hydroxychloroquine Won't Prevent COVID-19

Hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug touted and reportedly used by President Donald Trump as a preventative for COVID-19, appears not to have lived up to its hype, a new study shows.

Unlike some prior studies, this new trial was a "gold standard" prospective, randomi...

18 May
Intensive Blood Pressure Control Reduces A-Fib Risk: Study

Intensive Blood Pressure Control Reduces A-Fib Risk: Study

Intensive high blood pressure treatment may protect against a-fib, a heart rhythm disorder that can lead to stroke, heart attack and heart failure, researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 8,000 high blood pressure patients who were at increased risk of hea...

15 May
Could Interferon Drugs Help Fight COVID-19?

Could Interferon Drugs Help Fight COVID-19?

In the race to find treatments for COVID-19, the antiviral drug remdesivir has gotten much of the attention. But researchers say a class of long-used drugs called interferons also looks promising.

Trials testing the medications are underway in several countries. A sm...

15 May
Drug Combo Offers Hope Against Advanced Bladder Cancer

Drug Combo Offers Hope Against Advanced Bladder Cancer

A combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may slow the progress of metastatic bladder cancer and extend survival, a clinical trial suggests.

Current treatment for advanced bladder cancer is chemotherapy, but adding the immunotherapy drug atezolizumab (Tecentri...

08 May
Healthy Vitamin D Levels Could Be Linked to COVID-19 Survival

Healthy Vitamin D Levels Could Be Linked to COVID-19 Survival

There's been much speculation about whether vitamin D might prevent or help survival with COVID-19, and two new studies appear to underscore the link.

In the first study -- published in the journal Aging Clinical and Experimental Research -- British researche...

08 May
In Small Study, Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Appears to Help COVID-19 Patients

In Small Study, Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Appears to Help COVID-19 Patients

In the scramble to find medicines that beat back COVID-19, researchers from Italy report encouraging results from a small study on a rheumatoid arthritis drug already in use.

The drug, anakinra, may help quiet the runaway immune response known as a "cytokine storm," ...

05 May
Fewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad Thing

Fewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad Thing

There's been a sharp decline in the number of U.S. children taking part in cancer clinical trials over the past few decades, but researchers say that might be good news.

Why? Having more effective treatments available now may be one reason for that decrease, they exp...

30 Apr
Researchers Move Toward Once-Yearly Treatment for HIV

Researchers Move Toward Once-Yearly Treatment for HIV

Researchers have reformulated an HIV medication into a version they hope can eventually be taken as infrequently as once a year.

The work is only in the early stages, having been studied in lab animals. But the goal is to create an HIV drug that can be injected annua...

24 Apr
New Polio Vaccine Promising in Early Test

New Polio Vaccine Promising in Early Test

A new oral polio vaccine promises to help make polio a disease of the past, according to the results of a phase 1 clinical trial.

Polio was almost eliminated worldwide -- except in vaccine-induced cases. In those cases, the weakened virus used in vaccines developed ...

23 Apr
Lots of Drugs Are Being Tested Against COVID-19 -- But Will Any Work?

Lots of Drugs Are Being Tested Against COVID-19 -- But Will Any Work?

Dozens of drugs are being investigated for their value in treating COVID-19, as desperation drives doctors and researchers to look for something that could battle the virus and save lives.

"There are really no FDA-approved medications for the treatment of COVID-19, u...

22 Apr
Could an Ancient Drug Help Fight Severe COVID-19?

Could an Ancient Drug Help Fight Severe COVID-19?

As researchers hunt for ways to treat severe COVID-19 infections, a new trial will ask whether an old arthritis drug can prevent serious complications in the first place.

The medication, called colchicine, is an oral anti-inflammatory that has long been prescribed fo...

21 Apr
More Good News on Remdesivir's Power to Treat COVID-19

More Good News on Remdesivir's Power to Treat COVID-19

Preliminary data from two clinical trials using the antiviral drug remdesivir to treat COVID-19 patients is encouraging, researchers report.

One trial is providing the drug to patients with moderate illness and the other focuses on patients with severe illness.

...

09 Apr
Clinical Trial to Investigate Nitric Oxide Treatment of COVID-19

Clinical Trial to Investigate Nitric Oxide Treatment of COVID-19

Doctors at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) are enrolling patients in an international clinical trial to find out if inhaled nitric oxide benefits those with COVID-19 who have severely damaged lungs.

Right now, there are no approved treatments for the il...

07 Apr
Magnetic Brain 'Zap' Shows Promise Against Severe Depression

Magnetic Brain 'Zap' Shows Promise Against Severe Depression

Intensifying a standard form of brain stimulation may bring relief to people with hard-to-treat depression, a preliminary study suggests.

The study involved just 21 patients, but the treatment sent 90% into remission within a few days. That's a success rate that ...

06 Apr
Trials Begin for Potential COVID-19 Drug Remdesivir

Trials Begin for Potential COVID-19 Drug Remdesivir

A drug originally developed to treat Ebola is getting a second chance in the spotlight, as research teams in the United States, Asia and Europe race to test it against the new coronavirus.

The drug, called remdesivir, has already been given to a limited number of pat...

06 Apr
How One Patient's Battle With COVID-19 Changed U.S. Testing Protocols

How One Patient's Battle With COVID-19 Changed U.S. Testing Protocols

The first community-acquired case of COVID-19 in the United States posed many questions for doctors, but the answers they found led to key changes in federal guidelines for coronavirus testing, according to a case study.

The patient was an otherwise healthy woman in ...

25 Mar
Daily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study Finds

Daily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study Finds

Millions of Americans pop a low-dose aspirin each day to help ward off heart issues, but a new study finds that protection may not extend to dementia.

Although the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin have been touted as protection against thinking and memory (or "co...

18 Mar
Racial Bias Persists in Clinical Trial Recruitment

Racial Bias Persists in Clinical Trial Recruitment

Racial bias and stereotyping are common when researchers are recruiting people for cancer clinical trials, a new study finds.

"Examples of the stereotypes we observed included perceptions that African Americans were less knowledgeable about cancer research studies, l...

09 Mar
It's Tough for Clinical Trial Participants to Learn Results

It's Tough for Clinical Trial Participants to Learn Results

Most clinical trial participants are not told the results of their study -- even though most people want to know, and researchers want to tell them.

The reason: Communication is a big barrier, a new study says. Simply put, researchers and subjects may not speak the ...

04 Mar
New Weapon in Fight Against Multidrug-Resistant TB

New Weapon in Fight Against Multidrug-Resistant TB

While the world's focus is trained on the new coronavirus, a groundbreaking clinical trial finds researchers battling a tough-to-treat form of an "old" infectious disease, tuberculosis.

TB is a bacterial infection that usually attacks the lungs. The disease does not ...

26 Feb
Drug Shows Promise Against Aggressive Breast Cancer

Drug Shows Promise Against Aggressive Breast Cancer

The immunotherapy drug Keytruda might offer a new treatment option to women with an aggressive form of breast cancer, a clinical trial suggests.

The study found that for women with "triple-negative" breast cancer, adding Keytruda to standard chemotherapy improved the...

25 Feb
What Works Best to Ease Flare-Ups of COPD?

What Works Best to Ease Flare-Ups of COPD?

The best available drugs to treat sudden COPD flare-ups are the medications already widely in use, antibiotics and corticosteroids, a new evidence review has concluded.

There's not enough evidence to recommend newer treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseas...

18 Feb
Women Patients Still Missing in Heart Research

Women Patients Still Missing in Heart Research

Women remain underrepresented in heart disease research, even though it's the leading cause of death among women worldwide, researchers say.

Women accounted for less than 40% of all people enrolled in cardiovascular clinical trials from 2010 through 2017, accordi...

06 Feb
CRISPR Gene Editing Creates 'Designer' Immune Cells That Fight Cancer

CRISPR Gene Editing Creates 'Designer' Immune Cells That Fight Cancer

In a first, scientists have used gene-editing technology to create "designer" immune system cells that can fight tumors and survive for months in cancer patients' bodies.

It's a proof of principle, the researchers say -- and an early step toward bringing the gene-edi...

04 Feb
High-Tech 'Exoskeleton' Can Give Mobility Back to People With MS

High-Tech 'Exoskeleton' Can Give Mobility Back to People With MS

Most people take the ability to move for granted, but not Kathy Miska.

Miska has had multiple sclerosis for two decades now, and her ability to get around has deteriorated steadily.

Now, a new robotic exoskeleton is giving her an opportunity to regain some of t...

28 Jan
Too Few Patients Enrolling in Cancer Trials

Too Few Patients Enrolling in Cancer Trials

Enrollment in clinical trials that can potentially extend the life of cancer patients is too low, a new study finds.

Researchers at Penn State also found that white males with private health insurance and cancers that have spread, and who are treated at academic me...

22 Jan
New Drug Could Help Stop Blindness From Thyroid Eye Disease

New Drug Could Help Stop Blindness From Thyroid Eye Disease

The newly approved drug teprotumumab can offer hope to adults with thyroid eye disease, a rare and potentially blinding condition.

It's the first treatment specifically approved for thyroid eye disease. The drug was approved Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminis...

02 Jan
Gene Therapy May Be Long-Term Cure for Type of Hemophilia

Gene Therapy May Be Long-Term Cure for Type of Hemophilia

A new gene therapy appears to serve as a functional cure for the most common type of hemophilia, early clinical trial results indicate.

Patients who received the one-time intravenous therapy continue to have a more than 90% decrease in bleeding events two to three ...

23 Dec
Monkey Study Gives Hope for Zika Vaccine That Might Shield the Fetus

Monkey Study Gives Hope for Zika Vaccine That Might Shield the Fetus

An experimental Zika virus vaccine that was given before pregnancy protected monkey fetuses, researchers say.

The Zika DNA vaccine VRC5283 lowered levels of Zika virus in pregnant rhesus macaques and reduced the risk of fetal problems, according to the study publishe...

17 Dec
Male Researchers More Apt Than Women to Hype Findings: Study

Male Researchers More Apt Than Women to Hype Findings: Study

Male researchers are far more likely than female colleagues to claim that their findings are especially important, a new study says.

The language used to describe discoveries can affect how much attention researchers get and also affect their career advancement. Thes...

16 Dec
Cancer Drug Shows Promise for Parkinson's Patients

Cancer Drug Shows Promise for Parkinson's Patients

A drug used to fight chronic myeloid leukemia might also relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a new study finds.

In a phase 2 clinical trial, researchers found that the drug nilotinib (brand name: Tasigna) increased production of dopamine and halted decline in m...

20 Nov
Ultrasound May Ease Common Form of Hand Tremor

Ultrasound May Ease Common Form of Hand Tremor

A treatment that delivers ultrasound waves to the brain may bring lasting relief to some people with debilitating hand tremors, a new study finds.

The study involved 76 patients with essential tremor -- a neurological condition that most often causes trembling in the...

14 Nov
Experimental Injection May Protect Against Peanut Allergy

Experimental Injection May Protect Against Peanut Allergy

People with peanut allergy must be constantly vigilant to avoid a life-threatening allergic reaction. But researchers report that a new drug injection might offer at least temporary protection against the most severe reactions.

Just one shot of an experimental antib...

01 Nov
Drug Trio Could Give Patients With Cystic Fibrosis a New Option

Drug Trio Could Give Patients With Cystic Fibrosis a New Option

A three-drug combo that significantly improves lung function in cystic fibrosis patients could benefit 90% of people with the life-threatening disease, a new study suggests.

It included patients with a single copy of the most common genetic mutation for the disea...

30 Oct
Tainted Fecal Transplant Killed One Patient -- More Vigilance Needed

Tainted Fecal Transplant Killed One Patient -- More Vigilance Needed

Fecal transplants can bring the promise of an improved microbiome in ill patients, but a new report suggests they are not risk-free.

In a fecal transplant, donated fecal matter is processed and put into capsules for patients to swallow. Once in the gut, the capsules...

24 Oct
Could AI Beat Radiologists at Spotting Bleeds in the Brain?

Could AI Beat Radiologists at Spotting Bleeds in the Brain?

Computer-driven artificial intelligence (AI) can help protect human brains from the damage wrought by stroke, a new report suggests.

A computer program trained to look for bleeding in the brain outperformed two of four certified radiologists, finding abnormalities in...

22 Oct
FDA Approves New Drug for Most Common Form of Cystic Fibrosis

FDA Approves New Drug for Most Common Form of Cystic Fibrosis

A new drug to treat most cystic fibrosis patients has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Trikafta (elexacaftor/ivacaftor/tezacaftor) is the first triple combination therapy available to treat patients with the most common cystic fibrosis mutation...

17 Oct
Surgery Helps Tough-to-Treat Acid Reflux

Surgery Helps Tough-to-Treat Acid Reflux

For people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) that doesn't respond to the usual treatments, a complex surgery may help, a new study finds.

In carefully selected patients, the surgery provided much more relief than two different types of medication treatment...

01 Oct
Three-Drug Inhaler May Be an Advance for Asthma Patients

Three-Drug Inhaler May Be an Advance for Asthma Patients

A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest.

The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries. Patients tested out an inhaler that contained...

17 Sep
A Drink a Day Might Be Good for Diabetics' Health, Study Suggests

A Drink a Day Might Be Good for Diabetics' Health, Study Suggests

Chinese researchers may deserve a toast for their new findings that suggest light to moderate drinking may be beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes.

The review found that people who had a bit of alcohol daily had lower levels of a type of blood fat called trigly...

11 Sep
Cancer Drugs Sometimes Work in Unexpected Ways: Study

Cancer Drugs Sometimes Work in Unexpected Ways: Study

Ten cancer drugs being tested in human clinical trials appear to work -- but not in the ways their developers thought they would, researchers say.

"The idea for many of these drugs is that they block the function of a certain protein in cancer cells. And what we sho...

09 Sep
HRT Could Benefit Younger Women After Hysterectomy

HRT Could Benefit Younger Women After Hysterectomy

Estrogen therapy may help younger women live longer after having their uterus and ovaries surgically removed, new research reports.

The study found that when women under 60 received hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after surgery, their risk of dying during the 18-y...

04 Sep
Experimental Drug Works Quickly on Major Depression

Experimental Drug Works Quickly on Major Depression

Antidepressants typically take four to eight weeks to ease the debilitating symptoms of depression, but an early clinical trial found a new type of drug brought relief in just two weeks.

"SAGE-217, once fully developed, has potential to offer relatively quick and cli...

03 Sep
After Heart Attack, Stenting More Than the Blocked Artery May Be Best

After Heart Attack, Stenting More Than the Blocked Artery May Be Best

Opening all of a person's clogged arteries after a heart attack can protect their health better than reopening only the one that caused it, a major international clinical trial has concluded.

Opening all blockages and not just the "culprit...

13 Aug
Is a Chlamydia Vaccine on the Horizon?

Is a Chlamydia Vaccine on the Horizon?

A vaccine against the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia appears safe and potentially effective, an early trial suggests.

The phase 1 study included 35 healthy women. Those who were given injections of two possible vaccines developed antibodies to the chlamydia b...

06 Aug
Researchers 'Spin' Clinical Trial Findings in Top Psych Journals: Study

Researchers 'Spin' Clinical Trial Findings in Top Psych Journals: Study

Summary results of clinical trials published in top journals are often exaggerated, a new review charges.

The review says such spin -- exaggerating the clinical significance of a treatment without statistics to back it up -- is common in abstracts published in leadin...

24 Jun
Is Green Tea a Fad or a Real Health Boost?

Is Green Tea a Fad or a Real Health Boost?

Green tea is a popular health trend, with many people sipping it in hopes of deriving benefits from the brew.

There's nothing wrong with that, dietitians say -- green tea is a healthy drink loaded with antioxidants. But the jury's still out on many of its purported h...

21 Jun
Better Treatments Needed to Boost Brain Cancer Survival: Study

Better Treatments Needed to Boost Brain Cancer Survival: Study

Glioblastoma brain cancer remains one of deadliest tumors, and new research shows five-year survival rates remain low for patients with the disease.

While there have been improvements in short- and medium-term survival rates for patients with the most common type of ...

17 Jun
Common Blood Pressure Med Might Help Fight Alzheimer's

Common Blood Pressure Med Might Help Fight Alzheimer's

Treatment with blood pressure medication can improve blood flow to a key brain region in people with Alzheimer's disease, a small clinical trial has found.

Researchers stressed that they do not know whether the brain finding can translate into any benefits for patien...

10 Jun
Drug May Help Delay Onset of Type 1 Diabetes

Drug May Help Delay Onset of Type 1 Diabetes

A two-year delay in the onset of type 1 diabetes could make a big difference for people with the disease. And researchers say a new drug may make that postponement possible.

Researchers gave the drug teplizumab or a placebo to a small group of people who were nearly ...

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