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Health News Results - 178

17 May
Pandemic Caused Rise in Telemedicine Visits for Kids, But Will the Trend Continue?

Pandemic Caused Rise in Telemedicine Visits for Kids, But Will the Trend Continue?

Virtual doctor visits for children grew this past year during the pandemic, but a new poll shows U.S. parents are divided on whether they will continue using this option in the future.

The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the Universit...

17 May
Parents' Input Key When Screening Toddlers for Autism

Parents' Input Key When Screening Toddlers for Autism

Early screening for autism can speed up diagnosis and treatment, and now new research shows that pediatricians are more likely to act when parents express concerns.

According to pediatricians surveyed in the study, only 39% of toddlers who had failed a screening looking ...

05 May
Most Top U.S. Surgeons Are White and That's Not Changing

Most Top U.S. Surgeons Are White and That's Not Changing

White people continue to dominate top surgery positions at U.S. universities, while the number of Black and Hispanic surgeons remains flat, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of talented surgeons of different races, ethnicities and genders who do wonderful work and are ...

03 May
Many Older Americans Aren't Telling Their Doctors They Use Pot

Many Older Americans Aren't Telling Their Doctors They Use Pot

Aging potheads are now past 50 and still puffing away, but new research shows that many don't disclose this to their doctors.

Folks who use marijuana for medical reasons are more likely to tell their doctors about it than recreational users. Still, just a fraction of med...

03 May
Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Health care in rural America has become ever more scarce during the coronavirus pandemic, with folks finding it increasingly difficult to find a doctor or get to a hospital.

For a decade, rural areas have been losing hospitals to financial problems, forcing residents to ...

21 Apr
Little Progress in Boosting Numbers of Black American Doctors

Little Progress in Boosting Numbers of Black American Doctors

The percentage of U.S. doctors who are Black has barely risen in the past 120 years, and there's still a wide pay gap between white and Black physicians, a new study finds.

The analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from 1900 to 2018 included about 150,000 physicians, with ...

16 Apr
Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

While ER visits have stayed below normal levels as the coronavirus pandemic continues, the number of people showing up in the emergency department with mental woes is increasing, new federal government data shows.

Between March 29 and April 25, 2020, visits to emergency ...

14 Apr
4 in 10 Adults Over 50 Consult Online Reviews When Picking a Doctor

4 in 10 Adults Over 50 Consult Online Reviews When Picking a Doctor

Finding a new doctor can be a daunting task. For help, many older adults turn to online reviews, a new study finds.

In fact, many people rate online reviews as highly as they would a recommendation from friends and family when picking a doctor, the new research found.

09 Apr
Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers in U.S. emergency departments have struggled with significant mental health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

"As the nation moves into what many believe is a fourth wave of COVID, this study i...

06 Apr
Strain of COVID Care Has Many Health Professionals Looking for an Exit

Strain of COVID Care Has Many Health Professionals Looking for an Exit

After the pandemic, the next great health care challenge in the United States could be retaining highly trained doctors, nurses and scientists, a new study warns.

Up to one in five employees at an academic medical institution are considering leaving their professions ...

01 Apr
COVID Fears Mean More Cancers Are Being Diagnosed at Later Stages

COVID Fears Mean More Cancers Are Being Diagnosed at Later Stages

Cancer screening rates are beginning to rebound after plummeting during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey finds.

And patients are being diagnosed with more advanced cancers than before the pandemic, according to the American Society for Radiation O...

31 Mar
Too Few Minorities in U.S. Health Care Workforce: Report

Too Few Minorities in U.S. Health Care Workforce: Report

Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans are significantly underrepresented in U.S. health professions, with little indication that diversity will improve, a new study says.

In 2019, Black people made up about 12.1% of the U.S. workforce, but their representation in 10 hea...

26 Mar
Most Post-Surgical Opioids Go Unused: Study

Most Post-Surgical Opioids Go Unused: Study

Using cellphones to track patients' painkiller use, a new study found more than 60% of opioid painkillers prescribed to surgical patients after their procedures went unused.

That has implications for the ongoing epidemic of opioid misuse in the United States, where unuse...

25 Mar
In Rare Cases, People Can Get COVID After Vaccination

In Rare Cases, People Can Get COVID After Vaccination

It's very rare, but it is possible to catch COVID-19 even if you've been vaccinated, a new study finds.

Looking at vaccinated health care workers at two University of California campuses, researchers found a tiny number tested positive for the virus. This finding highli...

23 Mar
Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

Health care workers were just as uneasy as everyone else when COVID-19 vaccines were about to be approved in the United States, with large numbers hesitant to take the shot in early December, a new study reveals.

But that hesitancy dwindled over the next few weeks, as he...

23 Mar
Shortage of Primary Care Doctors Is Costing American Lives

Shortage of Primary Care Doctors Is Costing American Lives

The United States could save thousands of lives each year by addressing its lack of enough primary care doctors, a new study projects.

There has been a shortfall of U.S. primary care doctors for a long time, with much of the problem concentrated in rural areas and povert...

19 Mar
Surgical Patients Allergic to Penicillin Have Another Safe Alternative

Surgical Patients Allergic to Penicillin Have Another Safe Alternative

The antibiotic cefazolin is a safe alternative to prevent infection in most surgical patients who are allergic to penicillin, according to a new study.

Cefazolin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin. It's the recommended antibiotic for most surgical procedure...

17 Mar
Talks With Doctors May Be Key to Vaccine Acceptance: Study

Talks With Doctors May Be Key to Vaccine Acceptance: Study

Talking with their doctors may help convince reluctant Americans to get COVID-19 vaccines, evidence from a previous pandemic suggests.

Researchers analyzed responses from more than 19,000 people in the United States who were surveyed during the H1N1 swine flu pandemic in...

16 Mar
Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

Health care workers are more likely to catch COVID-19 at home or in their community than on the job, a new study finds.

"The news is reassuring in that it shows the measures taken are working to prevent infections from spreading in health care facilities," said study co-...

03 Mar
Choice of Brand-Name Drug Over Generics Costs Medicare Nearly $2 Billion Annually

Choice of Brand-Name Drug Over Generics Costs Medicare Nearly $2 Billion Annually

Wider use of prescription generic drugs could save Medicare nearly $2 billion a year, researchers say.

The new analysis of Medicare Part D prescription drug claims for 2017 used a random 20% of beneficiaries, 224 drugs with one or more generic substitutes and at least 1,...

02 Mar
Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Black and Hispanic Americans already face higher risks for dementia than the general population. Many also believe they'd get worse dementia care compared to white patients, according to a new Alzheimer's Association special report.

Older Black Americans are about twice ...

01 Mar
Many Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: Study

Many Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: Study

If you've gone to the doctor for a urinary tract infection (UTI), chances are that you've been given the wrong antibiotic or a longer-than-necessary treatment plan.

That's even more likely if you live in a rural area, researchers say.

A new study of private insuran...

23 Feb
Many Older Adults Confused About Proper Use of Antibiotics: Poll

Many Older Adults Confused About Proper Use of Antibiotics: Poll

Many older Americans lack knowledge about antibiotics, with some admitting to using leftover medication, a new survey reveals.

More than 2,200 adults, aged 50 to 80, were questioned. Nine out of 10 said they're cautious about using antibiotics, and nearly that number kne...

09 Feb
Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Although Alzheimer's disease is a devastating diagnosis that is better delivered earlier rather than later, new research suggests poor patients living in rural areas may not have access to the specialists who could spot the first signs of memory declines.

The team from V...

07 Feb
Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Doctors need to do a better job of discussing low blood sugar with patients who take high-risk diabetes medications such as insulin, researchers say.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common serious side effect of diabetes treatment. Severe cases can lead to fal...

04 Feb
Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Being rushed into hospital care can be an emotional experience. So, what a surgeon says to trauma or emergency surgery patients plays a role in how satisfied they are after their operations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 187,000 patients discha...

03 Feb
Most Dermatology Patients Like 'Telehealth' Visits: Survey

Most Dermatology Patients Like 'Telehealth' Visits: Survey

A majority of dermatology patients are happy with telehealth appointments in place of in-person office visits, a new study finds.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many medical specialties to move from in-person to online appointments, but dermatology had already seen inc...

02 Feb
Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Black and Hispanic children who land in the emergency room are less likely than white kids to receive X-rays, CT scans and other imaging tests, a new study finds.

Looking at more than 13 million ER visits to U.S. children's hospitals, researchers found that white childre...

02 Feb
Too Many U.S. Doctors Biased Against Patients With Disabilities: Study

Too Many U.S. Doctors Biased Against Patients With Disabilities: Study

Dr. Lisa Iezzoni is all too familiar with the discrimination that patients who have a disability can face: Having lived with multiple sclerosis for more than four decades and now in a wheelchair, she has also studied health care experiences and outcomes for people with disabil...

28 Jan
Too Many Kids With Special Needs Are Going Without Adequate Support

Too Many Kids With Special Needs Are Going Without Adequate Support

As many as one in five U.S. children has special health care needs, and some of their caregivers are struggling to get them the support, care and services they need, new research shows.

Kids with special health care needs may have physical conditions (such as asthma or d...

17 Jan
Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You

Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You

If you're having eye problems, you may not know which type of specialist to consult.

Here's some help from experts who explain the roles of an optometrist, ophthalmologist, pediatric ophthalmologist, orthoptist and optician.

Optometrists provide comprehensive eye c...

07 Jan
1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

One in four doctors has been personally attacked or sexually harassed on social media, a new study finds.

Women are more likely to be sexually harassed, while both men and women are attacked based on religion, race or medical recommendations, researchers say.

Docto...

06 Jan
Some Americans Can't Access Telemedicine, Study Shows

Some Americans Can't Access Telemedicine, Study Shows

Telemedicine rapidly expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic as people turned to their phones and computers rather than leave their homes for health care.

But some groups of people were left behind in the telemedicine boom, a new study reports.

Middle-aged and older ...

05 Jan
Health Care After COVID: The Rise of Telemedicine

Health Care After COVID: The Rise of Telemedicine

In late December, Dr. Ada Stewart asked her staff to check on a patient who had missed an appointment.

She soon learned that the patient had no transportation for the 45-minute drive, so Stewart offered to conduct the appointment by phone instead.

"It s...

28 Dec
Despite Setbacks, Reason for Hope Against COVID as 2020 Ends

Despite Setbacks, Reason for Hope Against COVID as 2020 Ends

As 2020 careens to a close, one thing is clear: With infections topping 19 million and a death toll over 333,000, the COVID-19 pandemic has upended nearly every facet of American life.

As a new year nears, two leaders in the response to the pandemic talked over mistakes ...

28 Dec
Blood Pressure Often Differs Widely Between Two Arms: Study

Blood Pressure Often Differs Widely Between Two Arms: Study

Blood pressure readings between the two arms can be different, and that disparity can sometimes be a warning sign of heart trouble down the road.

That's the finding of an analysis of 24 past studies: When people have at least a 5-point difference in blood pressure betwee...

23 Dec
Pandemic Taking Big Mental Health Toll on Health Care Workers

Pandemic Taking Big Mental Health Toll on Health Care Workers

Frontline health care workers have been through tremendous challenges this past year while treating COVID-19 patients throughout the world.

It should come as no surprise that many are having trouble emotionally.

A new study looked at the impact of the pandemic on s...

21 Dec
Pandemic Fuels Interest in Careers in Infectious Disease

Pandemic Fuels Interest in Careers in Infectious Disease

As scientists have labored to understand COVID-19 and develop a vaccine to combat it, interest in infectious disease careers seems to be growing.

Academic leaders from the United States and Israel have noted the increased interest among medical students.

"We just w...

20 Dec
How to Talk to Your Doctor About Arthritis Pain

How to Talk to Your Doctor About Arthritis Pain

Chronic pain can be excruciating, debilitating and hard to describe.

Yet the best way to get the right treatment for the exact pain you're experiencing is to put those symptoms into words, so your doctor can pinpoint a diagnosis and help you find relief.

The Arthri...

10 Dec
Don't Schedule Your Operation on Your Surgeon's Birthday

Don't Schedule Your Operation on Your Surgeon's Birthday

If you have a choice, you might want to avoid having an operation on your surgeon's birthday.

A new study finds that seniors who have emergency surgery on their surgeon's birthday have a much higher risk of dying in the following weeks.

Researchers analyzed data on...

30 Nov
'Repeat After Me' for Better Diabetes Care

'Repeat After Me' for Better Diabetes Care

Repeat this: The key to helping people with diabetes stay healthier and out of the hospital could be as simple as better communication.

And an underutilized technique called "teach-back" may make a big difference for type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients, a new study find...

30 Nov
Years Leading to Menopause See Uptick in Women's Heart Risks: AHA

Years Leading to Menopause See Uptick in Women's Heart Risks: AHA

Heart disease risk increases in women as they near menopause, so it's crucial to monitor their health and take preventive measures as needed, a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement says.

"Over the past 20 years, our knowledge of how the menopause tra...

20 Nov
Add Kids to COVID Vaccine Trials, Pediatricians' Group Says

Add Kids to COVID Vaccine Trials, Pediatricians' Group Says

Children should be included in COVID-19 vaccine trials at the earliest possible stage, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians says.

If that's not done, youngsters' lives could be at risk, according to the 67,000-member American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

"If we d...

13 Nov
Wrongly Prescribing Antibiotics Sets Dangerous Pattern

Wrongly Prescribing Antibiotics Sets Dangerous Pattern

Prescribing antibiotics for viral respiratory infections increases the risk of future infections and more antibiotic prescriptions, a new study warns.

Antibiotics are ineffective against viral infections.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from a U.S. insurer...

09 Nov
COVID CPR Safety Measures Don't Lessen Survival: Study

COVID CPR Safety Measures Don't Lessen Survival: Study

The effectiveness of CPR isn't compromised when EMS crews and others take recommended safety precautions against the new coronavirus, researchers say.

Interim guidance issued by the American Heart Association and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says h...

06 Nov
If Elected, Joe Biden Has Big Plans for Health Care

If Elected, Joe Biden Has Big Plans for Health Care

If Joe Biden becomes the next president, he would have clear and ambitious plans for the nation's health -- expanding the Affordable Care Act, empowering public health agencies to deal with COVID-19, and passing a stimulus bill that would support struggling doctors, hospitals ...

06 Nov
Preventive Health Care Falls by Wayside During Pandemic

Preventive Health Care Falls by Wayside During Pandemic

Americans saw their doctors for preventive and elective care far less often than usual in the first two months of the pandemic shutdown, according to a new study.

That meant far fewer colonoscopies, mammograms, blood sugar tests, vaccines for infants and toddlers, MRIs a...

04 Nov
Telemedicine Out of Reach for Those Who Can't Get Online

Telemedicine Out of Reach for Those Who Can't Get Online

As the COVID-19 pandemic spread throughout the United States, many people changed the way they live: As shopping, education and work shifted online, so did routine health care appointments.

However, while telemedicine seemed to make it easy to check in with a primary car...

28 Oct
Don't Let COVID-19 Keep You From Seeing Your Doctors

Don't Let COVID-19 Keep You From Seeing Your Doctors

Patients with chronic health problems don't need to put off seeing their doctors in person during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In fact, that could lead to other health problems, according to an expert from Rutgers Center for State Health Policy at the Institute for Health, Hea...

13 Oct
Pandemic Dangers Drive Some Doctors to Switch Jobs, Retire Early

Pandemic Dangers Drive Some Doctors to Switch Jobs, Retire Early

Dr. Brad Cotton enjoyed working on the front lines as an emergency room doctor. Yet in March, as the coronavirus pandemic burst through the doors at hospitals across the world, Cotton left that more dangerous work behind.

"I left emergency medicine because that was m...

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